Posted: August 3rd, 2022

2 paragraph comment

 

1. After reading the article on the pros and cons of 

standardized tests

, discuss how America’s approach to testing should be reformed in order for the testing movement to help improve American public education.

2. After reviewing

statewide assessment data

 at the Florida Department of Education website for a grade level and subject of your choice, compare school results and discuss the factors that may have impacted student performance.

Links: https://standardizedtests.procon.org/ 

         https://www.fldoe.org/accountability/assessments/k-12-student-assessment/results/

Assessments in the State of Florida

Florida Standards Assessment (FSA)

• Includes English Language Arts (ELA) Reading for Grades 3-10, Mathematics for
Grades 3-8, and Writing for Grades 4-10.

• ELA Reading
o Grades 3–5—Two 80-minute sessions
o Grades 6–8 —Two 85-minute sessions
o Grades 9–10—Two 90-minute sessions

• ELA Mathematics
o Grades 3–5—Two 80-minute sessions
o Grades 6–8 —Three 860-minute sessions

Statewide Science Assessment

• The Statewide Science Assessment measures student achievement of the Next Generation
Sunshine State Standards in science.

• Students in grades 5 and 8 participate in the statewide science assessment.

End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments

• EOC assessments are computer-based, criterion-referenced assessments that measure
the Florida Standards (FS) or the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS) for
specific courses, as outlined in their course descriptions.

• Includes exams for Algebra I, Biology 1, Geometry, U.S. History, and Civics, all of
which are aligned to the NGSSS.

• Are computer-based assessments.

Assessing Comprehension and Communication in English State-to-State (ACCESS) for
English Language Learners (ELLs) 2.0

• Large-scale test of English language proficiency based on the WIDA English Language
Development (ELD) Standards that form the core of WIDA’s approach to instructing and
assessing ELLs in Grades K–12.

• Paper-based assessment for Grades K–12.
• Another version for students in Grades 1–12 who have significant cognitive disabilities

called Alternate ACCESS for ELLs.
• Kindergarten students are administered all sections of the test, one-on-one with a teacher.

Students in grades 1–12 take the Speaking section of the test one-on-one with a teacher;
the Listening, Reading, and Writing sections may be administered in a group setting.
Students in grades 1–12 who have significant cognitive disabilities are administered all
sections of the test, one-on-one with a teacher.

National and International Assessments for Students in Florida

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

• NAEP also known as The Nation’s Report Card, is the largest nationally representative
and continuing assessment of what our nation’s students know and can do in core

subjects, such as civics, geography, mathematics, reading, U.S. history, and writing.
• NAEP is administered to fourth-, eighth-, and twelfth-graders across the country in a

variety of subjects. National results are available for all assessments and subjects. Results
are available for states and select urban districts in some subjects for grades 4 and 8.

• NAEP is administered on tablets with keyboards to a sample of fourth- and eighth-grade
students in the areas of mathematics, reading, writing, civics, geography, or U.S. history.
A small number of students may take paper-and-pencil assessments in mathematics or
reading.

• Results and trends are released for a variety of subjects are available for states. There are
no results for individual students, classrooms, or schools. View the latest NAEP results.

  • Educational Assessment of Students
  • Eighth Edition

    Chapter 18
    Finding and Evaluating
    Published Assessments

  • Copyright
  • © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Key Concepts
  • 18.1 You can search printed materials, online resources,
    and personal contacts to locate information about
    published assessments. After locating published tests,
    obtain and read evaluations or reviews of these tests.
    Internet searches and test publishers’ websites will help
    you locate computerized testing materials. There are also
    print and online resources for locating unpublished test
    materials, which can be useful in research and evaluation
    projects. Some publishers restrict the sale of test materials.
    To evaluate and select a test or assessment, clarify your
    purpose, obtain and review assessment materials, and try
    them out in a pilot study.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Some Print Resources
  • • Tests in Print (TIP) IX
    – information about more than 4,000 commercially

    available instruments
    – also available in Spanish

    • Tests: A Comprehensive Reference for Assessments
    in Psychology, Education, and Business

    – lists and describes ~2000 tests, but no evaluation

    • Textbooks

    • Test publishers’ catalogues

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  • Locating Published Tests Online
  • • Buros test locator

    • ETS test collection

    • Publishers’ websites

    • ERIC.gov, PsycINFO

    • General Internet search

    – use “assessment” or “test” as subject keyword

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Locating Published Tests through Personal
    Contacts

    • Contact professional contacts and organizations directly

    • Contact testing specialists in colleges and universities,
    perhaps via dept. chair

    • Visit promotional exhibits at conferences

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    Locating Evaluations of Published Tests
    from Print Sources

    • Use Mental Measurements Yearbooks (MMYs)
    – Reviews of hundreds of tests

    • Use Test Critiques (Volumes I–XI)
    – Testing specialist reviews each test

    • Search for reviews in professional journals

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    Locating Evaluations of Published Tests in
    Other Ways

    • Test Reviews Online from the Buros Center for Testing

    • Contact testing specialists in colleges and universities

    • Contact testing offices in schools, colleges, and
    universities

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Locating Unpublished Tests from Print
    Sources

    • ETS Test Collection

    • Directory of Unpublished Experimental Mental
    Measures

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  • Locating Unpublished Tests Online
  • • Health and Psychosocial Instruments (HAPI)

    • ETS Test Collection

    • Search ERIC.gov and PsycINFO

    • General Internet search

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    Some Publishers Restrict the Sale of Test
    Materials

    3 Levels of Restrictions

    • Level A
    – Tests may be ordered on official letterhead by an agency or

    organization in which qualified persons will administer and
    interpret the results.

    • Level B
    – Tests may be ordered by individuals who can verify they have

    sufficient training and supervised experience to administer and
    interpret the test.

    • Level C
    – Tests must be ordered by individuals who can verify they have a

    PhD or related degree and sufficient training

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Steps for Selecting a Test or Assessment
  • • Clarify your purpose

    • Obtain and review assessment materials

    • Try them out in a pilot study

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  • Review the Actual Assessment Materials
  • • Obtain the test and accompanying materials (specimen
    set)

    • Consider technical information about quality
    – Technical manuals often must be ordered separately

    • Work with a committee to review all materials in light of
    the planned purpose

    – Make sure achievement tests match the curriculum

    • Pilot test the test

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    Put New Assessment Plans into Local
    Context

    • Take stock of the assessments already being used in the
    district.

    – Develop perspective on what an external assessment
    contributes beyond the school-based assessments
    currently used.

    • Review state-mandated assessments and alignment with
    standardized tests.

    • Weigh the instructional value of standardized tests
    against that of teacher-based assessments.

    • Consider the qualifications of the staff.

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    Using a Standardized Test to Evaluate a
    School District

    • This is a difficult task!

    • A test is just one of many measures that should be used.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
    Copyright

      Educational Assessment of Students
      Key Concepts
      Some Print Resources
      Locating Published Tests Online

    • Locating Published Tests through Personal Contacts
    • Locating Evaluations of Published Tests from Print Sources
    • Locating Evaluations of Published Tests in Other Ways
    • Locating Unpublished Tests from Print Sources
    • Locating Unpublished Tests Online

    • Some Publishers Restrict the Sale of Test Materials
    • Steps for Selecting a Test or Assessment
      Review the Actual Assessment Materials

    • Put New Assessment Plans into Local Context
    • Using a Standardized Test to Evaluate a School District
    • Copyright

  • Educational Assessment of Students
  • Eighth Edition

    Chapter 17
    Interpreting Norm-
    Referenced Scores

  • Copyright
  • © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Key Concepts (1 of 2)
  • 17.1 A referencing framework is a structure used to compare a
    student’s performance to some-thing external to the assessment
    in order to interpret performance. A norm-referencing framework
    interprets a student’s assessment performance by comparing it
    to the performance of a well-defined group of other students who
    have taken the same assessment. A criterion-referencing
    framework interprets a student’s performance according to the
    kinds of performances a student can do in a domain. A
    standards-referenced framework combines elements of both.
    Test publishers may provide norm-referenced scores based on
    information from several different norm groups. Use normative
    information to describe student strengths, weak-nesses, and
    progress.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Key Concepts (2 of 2)
  • 17.2 Different types of norm-referenced scores are constructed to serve
    different purposes. The percentile rank tells the percentage of the students in a
    norm group who have scored lower than the raw score in question. A linear
    standard score tells how far a raw score is from the mean of the norm group,
    expressing the distance in standard deviation units.

    17.3 A normal distribution is a mathematical model (an equation) based on the
    mean and standard deviation of a set of scores. Normalized standard scores
    are based on transforming raw scores on an assessment to make them fit a
    normal distribution. Developmental and educational growth scales are norm-
    referenced scores that can be used to chart educational development or
    progress. An extended normalized standard score tells the location of a raw
    score on a scale that is anchored to a lower grade reference group. A grade-
    equivalent score tells the grade level at which a raw score is average.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Norm- versus Criterion-Referencing
  • • A norm-referencing framework interprets a student’s
    assessment performance by comparing it to the
    performance of a well-defined group of other students
    who have taken the same assessment.

    • A criterion-referencing framework interprets a student’s
    performance according to the kinds of performances a
    student can do in a domain.

    • A standards-referenced framework combines elements of
    both.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Norm Groups
  • • Local norm group: students in the same grade in the
    same school district

    – Schools/districts should have scores
    – Publishers may offer scores

    • National norm group: intended to be representative of
    students in the country

    – Test publishers use different norming procedures

    • Special norm group

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  • School Averages Norms
  • • School averages norms: ranked tabulation of the average
    (mean) score from each school building in a national
    sample of schools

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  • Guidelines for Using Publishers’ Norms
  • • Make sure the norm group is:
    – Relevant
    – Representative
    – Recent

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  • Percentile Rank
  • • The percentile rank tells the percentage of the students in
    a norm group who have scored lower than the raw score
    in question.

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  • Percentile Ranks: Advantages
  • • Easily understood.

    • Clearly reflect norm-referencing.

    • Permit a person’s performance to be compared to a
    variety of norm groups.

    • Can be used to compare a student’s relative standing in
    each of several achievement or ability areas.

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  • Percentile Ranks: Limitations
  • • Can be confused with percentage correct scores.

    • Can be confused with some other types of two-digit
    derived scores.

    • Do not form an equal-interval scale.

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  • Linear Standard Score
  • • A linear standard score tells how far a raw score is from
    the mean of the norm group, expressing the distance in
    standard deviation units.

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  • Z Scores
  • • Communicate students’ norm-referenced achievement
    expressed as a distance away from the mean.

    – if Z = −1.5, the student’s score is 1.5 standard
    deviations below the average score.

    • Can be used for norm-referenced comparison of raw
    scores with different metrics

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    SS Scores

    • Tells the location of a raw score in a distribution having a
    mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10.

    – Transformation of z score
    – Example: If Z = −1.5, SS = 35

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  • Normalized Standard Scores
  • • A normal distribution is a mathematical model (an
    equation) based on the mean and standard deviation of a
    set of scores.

    – Normal curves are smooth, continuous, symmetrical,
    and bell shaped

    • Normalized standard scores are based on transforming
    raw scores on an assessment to make them fit a normal
    distribution.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Normalized z -Scores
  • • z-scores that have percentile ranks corresponding to
    what we would expect in a normal distribution

    Raw Score Percentile
    rank

    Normalized
    standard (zn)

    Linear
    standard (z)

    36 98 2.05 2.43
    33 96 1.75 1.64
    15 4 −1.75 −3.09
    14 2 −2.05 −3.36

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Normalized T-scores

    • Tell the location of a raw score in a normal distribution
    having a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10.

    – Example: Joey’s T-score is 40, which means he is
    one standard deviation below the mean of the norm
    group, and his percentile rank is approximately 16.

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    Deviation IQ Scores

    • Tells the location of a raw score in a normal distribution
    having a mean of 100 and a standard deviation of 15 or
    16.

    – Example: Meghan has DIQ = 116, which means she
    has scored one standard deviation above the mean of
    her age group and the percentile rank of her score is
    84.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Stanines
  • • Tells the location of a raw score in a specific segment of a
    normal distribution.

    – Example: Blake’s stanine on the spelling subtest of
    the standardized test was 3, which means that his
    raw score was in the lower 20% of the norm group.
    Specifically, his percentile rank was between 11 and
    22.

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    SAT-Scores

    • Historically, a normalized standard score from a
    distribution that has a mean of 500 and a standard
    deviation of 100.

    • The SAT program no longer uses this computation, but
    the current scores on the 200-800 scale can be
    compared across administrations.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Normal Curve Equivalents
  • • NCE scores are normalized standard scores with a mean
    of 50 and a standard deviation of 21.06.

    • Primary value is evaluating gains from various
    educational programs that use different publishers’ tests

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Developmental and Educational Growth
    Scales

    • Developmental and educational growth scales are norm-
    referenced scores that can be used to chart educational
    development or progress.

    – Extended normalized standard score scale
    – Grade-equivalent score scale

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Extended Normalized Standard Score
  • • An extended normalized standard score tells the location
    of a raw score on a scale that is anchored to a lower
    grade reference group.

    – Based on extended z scale Or
    – Based on item response theory

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  • Grade-Equivalent Score
  • • A grade-equivalent score tells the grade level at which a raw
    score is average.

    – Useful for reporting educational development.
    – Provided by test publisher.

    ▪ GE is the median score (sometimes mean score) in
    each grade’s norm group.

    ▪ A third grader’s GE score of 5.7 on a mathematics test
    covering third-grade content does not mean that this
    student should be placed in fifth-grade math. Rather, it
    means that he scored the same as the average 5th
    grader (7th month) on the third-grade test.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Things to Keep in Mind When Interpreting
    Grade Equivalents (1 of 2)

    • In some subject areas, students’ performance drops over
    the summer months.

    • The meaning of grade-equivalent scores for a subject
    depends very much on the subject matter.

    • Grade-equivalent scores do not necessarily indicate
    mastery of the material.

    • The more closely the test items match the material
    emphasized in the classroom before the test was
    administered, the more likely the students will score well
    above grade level.

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    Things to Keep in Mind When Interpreting
    Grade Equivalents (2 of 2)

    • Grade equivalents from different tests cannot be
    interchanged.

    • Grade equivalents for different subjects cannot be
    compared.

    • Grade equivalents do not indicate “normal” growth.

    • The grade-equivalent score scale does not have a one-
    to-one correspondence with the number of questions a
    student answers correctly on a test.

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  • Guidelines for Score Interpretation
  • • Look for patterns in scores.

    • Seek explanations for the patterns.

    • Don’t expect many surprises.

    • Don’t overinterpret small differences.

    • Use evidence from other assessments to clarify
    interpretations.

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  • Typical Misunderstandings (1 of 2)
  • • The grade-equivalent score tells which grade the student should be
    in.

    – They Do Not.

    • The percentile rank and percent-correct scores mean the same thing.
    – They Do Not.

    • The percentile rank norm group consists of only the students in a
    particular classroom.

    – It Does Not.

    • “Average” is the standard to beat.
    – It Is Not.

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  • Typical Misunderstandings (2 of 2)
  • • Small changes in percentile ranks over time are
    meaningful.

    – They Are Not.

    • Percent-correct scores below 70 are failing.
    – They Are (Usually) Not.

    • If you get a perfect score, your percentile rank must be
    99.

    – It May Not Be.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
    Copyright

      Educational Assessment of Students
      Key Concepts (1 of 2)
      Key Concepts (2 of 2)
      Norm- versus Criterion-Referencing
      Norm Groups
      School Averages Norms
      Guidelines for Using Publishers’ Norms
      Percentile Rank
      Percentile Ranks: Advantages
      Percentile Ranks: Limitations
      Linear Standard Score
      Z Scores

    • S S Scores
    • Normalized Standard Scores
      Normalized z -Scores

    • Normalized T – s c o r e s
    • Deviation I Q Scores
    • Stanines

    • S A T-Scores
    • Normal Curve Equivalents

    • Developmental and Educational Growth Scales
    • Extended Normalized Standard Score
      Grade-Equivalent Score

    • Things to Keep in Mind When Interpreting Grade Equivalents (1 of 2)
    • Things to Keep in Mind When Interpreting Grade Equivalents (2 of 2)
    • Guidelines for Score Interpretation
      Typical Misunderstandings (1 of 2)
      Typical Misunderstandings (2 of 2)
      Copyright

  • Educational Assessment of Students
  • Eighth Edition

    Chapter 16
    Standardized Achievement

    Tests

  • Copyright
  • © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Key Concepts (1 of 2)
  • 16.1 Standardized tests are tests for which the procedures,
    administration, materials, and scoring rules are fixed so
    that as far as possible the assessment is the same at
    different times and places. Appropriate administration of
    standardized tests and appropriate use of results is key to
    their effectiveness. Inappropriate administration or use can
    lead to harmful consequences.

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  • Key Concepts (2 of 2)
  • 16.2 Standardized achievement tests include multilevel
    survey batteries, multilevel criterion-referenced tests, other
    multilevel tests for a single curricular area, and single-level
    tests for one course or subject area. State- or district-
    mandated tests include state achievement tests
    customized to state standards, interim or benchmark tests
    and services, Response to Intervention (RTI) assessments,
    early childhood assessments, and English language
    proficiency tests.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Definition of Standardized Test
  • • Standardized tests are tests for which the procedures,
    administration, materials, and scoring rules are fixed so
    that as far as possible the assessment is the same at
    different times and places.

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  • Steps in Standardized Test Development
  • 1. Assemble preliminary ideas.
    2. Evaluate proposal (approve/reject).
    3. Make formal arrangement (sign contract if publication is approved).
    4. Prepare test specifications.
    5. Write items.
    6. Conduct item tryout.
    7. Assemble final test form(s).
    8. Conduct national standardization.
    9. Prepare final materials.
    10. Prepare marketing plan.
    11. Publish.

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    Other Considerations in Standardized Test
    Development

    • Universal design (to maximize access)

    • Using technology
    – Plan accommodations early
    – Plan for teacher training
    – Plan for student training

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  • Standardized Test Score Reports
  • • Levels of reporting
    – Individual student reports, class reports, building- and

    district-level reports

    • Effective reports
    – Concise and readable
    – Focus data displays on a few purposes
    – Not too much information

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  • Varieties of Standardized Tests
  • • Commercially published achievement tests
    – Multilevel survey batteries
    – Multilevel criterion-referenced tests

    • Federally mandated state assessments

    • Commercially produced interim and benchmark
    assessments and services

    • Other commercially available tests

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Multilevel Survey Batteries (1 of 2)
  • • Survey general educational growth or basic skill
    development

    – Multilevel = test content spans several grade levels
    – Battery = several curricular areas are assessed by

    different subtests

    • Often annually administered

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  • Multilevel Survey Batteries (2 of 2)
  • • Generally include information about:
    – Test development
    – Test administration
    – Norming features
    – Scoring
    – Interpreting and reporting scores

    • Differ based on:
    – Content emphasis
    – Articulation between grade levels
    – Services offered to schools

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  • Selecting a Multilevel Survey Battery
  • • Select a test that best fits your school’s curriculum and
    the state standards.

    • Be attentive to community concerns.

    • Plan to use a test at least 5 years.

    • When possible, test at grade levels not tested by state-
    mandated assessments.

    • Provide individually administered assessments when
    appropriate for students with special needs.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Multilevel Criterion-Referenced Tests
    (Single Curricular Area)

    • Provide detailed information about students’ status for a
    well-defined domain of performance in a single subject
    area (e.g., mathematics).

    – Span several grade levels
    – Some align with state standards

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    Other Multilevel Tests for a Single
    Curricular Area

    • Tend to be deeper and broader than survey tests

    • Should not be used to compare performance in two or
    more areas

    – Usually not normed on same population

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    Single-Level Standardized Tests for One
    Course or Subject

    • Assess achievement at only one educational level or for
    one course (e.g., Algebra I)

    – Often called “end-of-course” tests or exams

    • For most purposes, a teacher-made test for a subject is
    more appropriate.

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  • State-Mandated Tests
  • • ESSA requires testing all students in Grades 3 through 8
    and high school

    – Accountability is usually the focus
    ▪ Should be used along with teacher development

    programs

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    Assessments of Common Core State
    Standards

    • Search the Internet for the most recent information
    regarding:

    – Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College
    and Careers (PARCC)

    – Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium
    – National Center and State Collaborative Partnership

    (NCSC)
    – Dynamic Learning Maps Alternate Assessment

    System Consortium (DLM)

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  • Interim or Benchmark Assessments
  • • Used for predicting and shaping students’ performance
    during the year, to maximize performance on the annual
    state test.

    – Example: Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)

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  • Other Assessments
  • • Response to Intervention (RTI) assessments
    – Measure how well students respond to changes in

    instruction

    • Early Childhood Assessments
    – Used to make certain that young children will be

    ready for the demands of accountability testing when
    they are older

    • English Language Proficiency Tests

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    Uses for Standardized Tests in the
    Classroom (1 of 2)

    • Describe the educational developmental levels of each
    student.

    • Describe specific qualitative strengths and weaknesses in
    students.

    – Use this information to remediate deficiencies and
    capitalize on strengths.

    • Describe the extent to which a student has achieved
    prerequisites needed to go on.

    – Use along with classroom performance to make
    recommendations for placement.

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    Uses for Standardized Tests in the
    Classroom (2 of 2)

    • Describe commonalities among students.
    – Use info to group students for instruction.

    • Describe students’ achievement of specific learning
    objectives.

    – Use info to make changes in instruction.

    • Provide students and parents with feedback about
    students’ progress toward learning goals.

    – Use info to establish a plan for home and school to
    work together.

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    Extra Classroom Uses for Standardized
    Tests

    • Make decisions about curriculum or instructional
    changes.

    • Describe the relative effectiveness of the local
    educational enterprise.

    • Compare the relative effectiveness of the local
    educational enterprise.

    • Describe the relative effectiveness of innovations or
    experiments in education.

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  • Misuses of Standardized Tests (1 of 2)
  • • Using only results from one standardized test for:
    – Placing a student in a special instructional program
    – Retaining a student in a grade
    – Judging an entire school program’s quality

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  • Misuses of Standardized Tests (2 of 2)
  • • Using a survey achievement battery to prescribe the
    specific content teachers should teach at certain grade
    levels

    • Attributing a student’s poor assessment results to only
    one cause

    • Blaming the teacher if the class does poorly

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Classroom Teachers’ Roles
  • • Follow prescribed directions when you administer a
    standardized test.

    • Prepare your students for standardized testing in ethical
    and appropriate ways.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Ethical Practices
  • • Teaching the learning objectives in the curriculum without
    narrowing teaching to those objectives that appear on a
    standardized assessment.

    • Teaching general test-taking strategies and integrating a
    variety of test-taking formats into teaching, so students
    learn how to respond to them.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Unethical Practices
  • • Giving your students practice on a published parallel form
    of the assessment they will take.

    • Giving your students practice on the same questions and
    tasks that they will take later.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

  • Questionable Practices
  • • Teaching only those learning objectives that specifically
    match the objectives that will appear on the standardized
    assessment your students will take.

    • Teaching only those learning objectives that specifically
    match the objectives that will appear on the standardized
    assessment your students will take and giving practice on
    those objectives using only the same types of task
    formats that will appear on the assessment.

    Copyright © 2019, 2015, 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved
    Copyright

      Educational Assessment of Students
      Key Concepts (1 of 2)
      Key Concepts (2 of 2)
      Definition of Standardized Test
      Steps in Standardized Test Development

    • Other Considerations in Standardized Test Development
    • Standardized Test Score Reports
      Varieties of Standardized Tests
      Multilevel Survey Batteries (1 of 2)
      Multilevel Survey Batteries (2 of 2)
      Selecting a Multilevel Survey Battery

    • Multilevel Criterion-Referenced Tests (Single Curricular Area)
    • Other Multilevel Tests for a Single Curricular Area
    • Single-Level Standardized Tests for One Course or Subject
    • State-Mandated Tests

    • Assessments of Common Core State Standards
    • Interim or Benchmark Assessments
      Other Assessments

    • Uses for Standardized Tests in the Classroom (1 of 2)
    • Uses for Standardized Tests in the Classroom (2 of 2)
    • Extra Classroom Uses for Standardized Tests
    • Misuses of Standardized Tests (1 of 2)
      Misuses of Standardized Tests (2 of 2)
      Classroom Teachers’ Roles
      Ethical Practices
      Unethical Practices
      Questionable Practices
      Copyright

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