Posted: August 2nd, 2022

6051 WK10 Assgn 1

Adultism refers to the oppression of young people by adults. The popular saying “children should be seen and not heard” is used as a way to remind children of their place and reaffirm adults’ power in the relationship. The saying suggests that children’s voices are not as important or as valid as an adult’s, and they should remain quiet. Children are often relegated to subordinate positions due to socially constructed beliefs about what they can or cannot accomplish or what they should or should not do; this, in turn, compromises youths’ self-determination.

How might the age of a client influence your social work practice? And, when working with youth, how would you avoid conveying an adultist perspective? In this Discussion, you practice engaging with an adolescent through a scenario. You then reflect on your actions and how you would adapt if the scenario were to involve an older client.

To Prepare

  • Review the Learning Resources on ageism, aging, and practice with older adults.
  • Access and navigate through the Adolescent Case interactive video in the Learning Resources, selecting your responses as the session progresses.
  • Reflect on the choices you made as a social worker engaging with the adolescent and consider how those choices may have been influenced by the age of the client.

By Day 3

Write a post in which you reflect on your experience engaging with the adolescent in the case.

  • How did you approach the case, and how did the age of the client factor into your decision making?
  • Then, imagine it was an older client (age 75 or above) in the same situation. How comfortable or uncomfortable would you be?
  • Would your approach be different based on cultural norms related to age? 

AdolescentCase

© 2021 Walden University, LLC

1

  • Adolescent Case
  • Program Transcript
  • INTRODUCTION

    Warning: The following scenario discusses depression and suicide. It can be
    emotionally triggering.

    The scenario lasts 8–11 minutes. If you need to exit the scenario, please stop at any
    time.

    You are preparing to meet with a high school student who has abruptly started skipping
    classes and failing assignments. A friend of the student recently committed suicide,
    which may be the cause of her disengagement. The parent and school administration
    have agreed the student will leave early today to attend counseling. You are waiting for
    her to arrive.

    NOTE: When you click on a hyperlink in this document, you will move to the intended
    result of the described response or action.

    YOUR OFFICE

    (You are seated behind your desk facing your closed office door. There is a knock on
    the door, it opens, and your client enters your office.)

    CLAIRE: Hi, I’m here for my appointment. I’m Claire. (closes door)

    (Your client is seated on the couch with her arms crossed and looking toward the
    ground.)

    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 1.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    2

    DECISION POINT 1

    First, assess your client’s body language; something you should be doing constantly.
    What do you interpret?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: She doesn’t want to be here.

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 1
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: She looks uncomfortable.

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 1

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    • Right. There are lots of ways to interpret body language. Make sure you
    are doing these kinds of mental checks often.

    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 2.

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    • Right. There are lots of ways to interpret body language. Make sure you
    are doing these kinds of mental checks often.

    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 2.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    3

    DECISION POINT 2

    How do you begin the session?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: Ask about her day.

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 2
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: Let her know this space is safe and confidential.

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 2

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    • Starting with small talk works, but before asking what’s going on, make
    sure she knows that this space is safe and confidential, unless she
    mentions hurting herself or others.

    o Click here to let her know this space is safe and confidential.

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: So, you can’t tell anyone about this? (shakes head as though she’s
    confused) OK.

    • Right. There are lots of ways to interpret body language. Make sure you
    are doing these kinds of mental checks often.

    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 3.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    4

    DECISION POINT 3

    How do you proceed?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: Tell her that her parents are worried about her.

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 3
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: Ask her about problems at school.

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 3
    -OR-

    3. YOUR REPONSE: Ask her why she’s here.

    RESPONSE OPTION 3 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 3

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: (sarcastically) Sorry!
    o Click here to ask her why she is here.

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: (defiantly) What problems?
    o Click here to ask her why she is here.

    RESPONSE 3 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: My dad said I had to. (shakes head) It really sucks. Like, I didn’t choose
    to be here.

    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 4.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    5

    DECISION POINT 4

    Active listening can inspire trust and encourage her to interact with her emotions.
    Indirect questions like these can help facilitate direct mental health questions later on.

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: “Sometimes we have to go places we don’t choose.”

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 4
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: “Your dad only said that because he cares.”

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 4
    -OR-

    3. YOUR REPONSE: “It sounds like things are out of your control. How does
    that feel?”

    RESPONSE OPTION 3 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 4

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: OK, I get it. You don’t have to talk to me like a kid.

    • Be careful, this may come off as condescending. You want to create a
    comfortable environment.

    o Click here to say, “I apologize, that was insensitive. Can we start
    over?”

    CLAIRE: Yeah, fine. Let’s just get this over with. (looks out the window)

    • Since the client didn’t choose to be here, ask if she feels like things are out
    of her control.

    o Click here to say, “It sounds like things are out of your control. How
    does that feel?”

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    6

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK
    CLAIRE: What the hell! Whose side are you on here?

    • Be careful, you are meant to be a neutral party. It’s important to maintain
    trust through active listening.

    o Click here to say, “I apologize, that was insensitive. Can we start
    over?”

    CLAIRE: Yeah, fine. Let’s just get this over with. (looks out the window)
    • Since the client didn’t choose to be here, ask if she feels like things are out
    of her control.
    o Click here to say, “It sounds like things are out of your control. How
    does that feel?”

    RESPONSE 3 – FEEDBACK

    • Affirming your client’s feelings is a great way to keep building trust.
    o Click here to Continue to Decision Point 5.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    7

    CLAIRE: It feels awful. Like no one’s listening to me. (shakes head) At least I
    don’t have to go to rehearsal anymore.

    DECISION POINT 5

    Now that the client has opened up, what can you do to keep the conversation going?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: Ask about problems at school.

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 5
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: Ask what she does for fun.

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 5
    -OR-

    3. YOUR REPONSE: Ask about rehearsal.

    RESPONSE OPTION 3 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 5

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: What problems? Why does everyone think there is some kind of big
    problem? I’m fine. What’s your problem? (gestures toward you)

    • Don’t be too quick to jump to a “problem.” This kind of language can make
    a client think they’ve done something wrong.

    o Click here to say, “You’re right. I was out of line.”

    CLAIRE: Whatever. (looks out the window)

    • Try asking about rehearsal because she just brought that up.
    o Click here to ask about rehearsal.

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: I don’t know…stuff. (looks away shaking her head)

    • Claire already mentioned an interest, so this question might come off like
    you aren’t listening.

    o Click here to ask about rehearsal.

    RESPONSE 3 – FEEDBACK
    CLAIRE: It’s nothing. It’s just a dumb play. I don’t really want to talk about it.
    (looks out the window)

    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 6.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    8

    DECISION POINT 6

    Notice how she shuts down after being asked about the play. This may require a more
    direct approach. How should you proceed?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: Change the subject.

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 6
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: Keep the discussion focused on rehearsal.

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 6

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    • She may be backpedaling from emotional tension. It’s important to
    recognize she can’t work through her emotions if she avoids them.

    o Click here to keep the discussion focused on rehearsal.

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    • Pushing on a point of tension can be uncomfortable, but your role is to
    help her work through emotions. She can’t do that if she avoids them.

    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 7.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    9

    CLAIRE: (looks directly at you) Oh, you want to hear about the play.
    (sarcastically) It’s great. So great Jules would rather kill herself than be in it.

    DECISION POINT 7

    Careful. Claire is starting to talk flippantly about suicide. How will you proceed?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: Tell her she shouldn’t joke about suicide.

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 7
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: Ask about Jules.

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 7

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    • This isn’t the recommended way to treat someone dealing with loss.
    Strong reactions may be coping mechanisms.

    o Click here to ask about Jules.

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    • It may be tough, but she brought Jules up, so it makes sense to stay on
    the topic.

    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 8.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    10

    CLAIRE: She was my best friend, and she’s gone. Everyone keeps telling me,
    “You’ll be OK Claire,” but … (shrugs) I honestly don’t think I will. And my parents
    are all, “Keep doing the play, Claire. It’s good for you, Claire. Keep hanging out
    with your friends, Claire. Keep being normal, Claire.” And I have to keep playing
    along and going to those stupid rehearsals even though it reminds me of her.
    (crying as she puts her head in her hand).

    DECISION POINT 8

    How should you proceed when a client starts crying?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: Get up and sit next to her to reassure her.

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 8
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: Tell her it will be alright.

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 8
    -OR-

    3. YOUR REPONSE: Let her cry, offer tissues.

    RESPONSE OPTION 3 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 8

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    • Careful. You want to avoid crowding people who are crying. You are there
    to create a relaxed, safe place.

    o Click here to let her cry and offer tissues.

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    • You can’t guarantee it will be alright, and saying it can minimize someone’s
    feelings, making them feel even worse.

    o Click here to let her cry and offer tissues.

    RESPONSE 3 – FEEDBACK

    • This is the correct course of action.
    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 9.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    11

    DECISION POINT 9

    What do you say next?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: “What’s the thought that made you cry?”

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 9
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: “Don’t you feel better?”

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 9
    -OR-

    3. YOUR REPONSE: “Can we talk more about what you’re feeling?”

    RESPONSE OPTION 3 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 9

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    • Make sure your client continues interacting with her feelings, not just her
    thoughts.

    o Click here to ask, “Can you talk more about what you’re feeling?”

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    • Try not to assume her feelings. Instead, ask about the cause.
    o Click here to ask, “Can you talk more about what you’re feeling?”

    RESPONSE 3 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: (crying) I was … I was remembering Jules and how happy she was last
    year during callbacks. Callbacks were posted, and she got the part she wanted. I
    think that was the last time I saw her so happy. (pauses, then with voice
    quivering) And now I won’t see her that happy again. (continues to cry and puts
    her head in her hand)

    • The client seems to be opening up more.
    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 10.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    12

    CLAIRE: (crying) I’m sorry. It’s been so hard to deal with her (pauses), with her
    being gone. I felt really alone. I haven’t talked about it with anyone since it
    happened.

    ACTION POINT

    At this point, it might be a good idea to perform a suicide assessment.

    DECISION POINT 10

    What signs (if any) have you noticed up to this point that could prompt a mental health
    evaluation?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: Recklessness

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 10
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: Dramatic changes in mood

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 10
    -OR-

    3. YOUR REPONSE: Withdrawing from friends, family, or society

    RESPONSE OPTION 3 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 10
    OR-

    4. YOUR REPONSE: Rage or anger

    RESPONSE OPTION 4 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 10
    OR-

    5. YOUR REPONSE: None of these

    RESPONSE OPTION 5 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 10

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    13

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    • The client hasn’t presented this sign but is withdrawn and has had a slightly
    unstable mood. You will need to monitor these as you go forward.

    o Click here to continue with session.

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    • True. This, as well as withdrawing from school, is a factor you will need to
    monitor as you go forward.

    o Click here to continue with session.

    RESPONSE 3 – FEEDBACK

    • True. This, as well as changes in mood, are factors you will need to
    monitor as you go forward.

    o Click here to continue with session.

    RESPONSE 4 – FEEDBACK

    • The client hasn’t presented this sign but is withdrawn and has had a slightly
    unstable mood. You will need to monitor these as you go forward.
    o Click here to continue with session.

    RESPONSE 5 – FEEDBACK

    • The client has presented a few of these signs. If you have time after
    completing the experience, go back and rewatch the interactions up to this
    point.

    o Click here to Continue with session.

    ACTION POINT

    Considering the Columbia Suicide Severity Scale, now is the time to ask a suicide
    ideation prompt. It may seem overly direct, but it’s important to be able to ask this
    question like you’d ask any other.

    o Click here to ask, “Have you had any thoughts about killing
    yourself?”

    CLAIRE: What, of course not. I’m just … I’m trying to not let everyone down. I …
    I feel like I can’t talk about this with anyone. Everyone is trying to help, but
    nobody listens. (pauses) You’re not going to tell anyone about this, are you?

    • Reaffirm that this conversation is confidential, unless the client mentions
    hurting herself or others.

    o Click here to continue to Decision Point 11.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    14

    DECISION POINT 11

    The client is still quite emotional but seems to have opened up to the conversation. How
    will you proceed in a gentle way?

    1. YOUR RESPONSE: “It’s not your fault, you couldn’t have known this
    would happen.”

    RESPONSE OPTION 1 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 11
    -OR-

    2. YOUR RESPONSE: “You have to remember, she’s in a better place now.”

    RESPONSE OPTION 2 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 11
    -OR-

    3. YOUR REPONSE: “It’s OK to cry, maybe it would help to talk about what
    happened?”

    RESPONSE OPTION 3 – CLICK HERE TO CHOOSE THIS RESPONSE FOR
    DECISION POINT 11

    RESPONSE 1 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: It’s not my fault? How would you even know. You don’t even know
    anything about it. She told me she was going to do it. She joked about it, and I
    just ignored her like it wasn’t serious. (shakes head) How is it not my fault?

    • Statements like “it’s not your fault” or “she’s in a better place” can minimize
    a client’s feelings. Remember to give her space.

    o Click here to ask, “Can you talk more about what you’re feeling?”

    RESPONSE 2 – FEEDBACK

    CLAIRE: (crying and sarcastically) She’s in a better place now? What does that
    even mean? She’s gone! You know I … I didn’t listen when she joked about
    killing herself, and I just … (pauses) I just went about my life like nothing was
    wrong.

    • Statements like “it’s not your fault” or “she’s in a better place” can minimize
    a client’s feelings. Remember to give her space.
    o Click here to ask, “Can you talk more about what you’re feeling?”

    RESPONSE 3 – FEEDBACK
    CLAIRE: I just … (pauses) all I can think about is how Jules joked about wanting
    to die and how she was going to do it. I just ignored it like it was nothing.

    • Though the client is still in obvious emotional pain, it’s a good sign she
    feels open enough to talk it through.

    Adolescent Case
    © 2021 Walden University, LLC

    15

    o Click here to continue to Conclusion.

    CLAIRE: God, why is this so hard. I can’t stand feeling like this all the time. It’s
    made every day a drag. (pauses) I can’t believe I waited this long to talk to
    someone about it.

    CONCLUSION

    You’ve completed the exercise.

    Click here to start the experience again.

      Adolescent Case
      Program Transcript
      INTRODUCTION
      YOUR OFFICE
      CLAIRE: Hi, I’m here for my appointment. I’m Claire. (closes door)
      (Your client is seated on the couch with her arms crossed and looking toward the ground.)
      DECISION POINT 1
      DECISION POINT 2
      CLAIRE: So, you can’t tell anyone about this? (shakes head as though she’s confused) OK.
      DECISION POINT 3
      DECISION POINT 4
      DECISION POINT 5
      DECISION POINT 6
      DECISION POINT 7
      DECISION POINT 8
      DECISION POINT 9
      ACTION POINT
      DECISION POINT 10
      ACTION POINT
      DECISION POINT 11
      CONCLUSION

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