Posted: September 20th, 2022

8085 MD2 Discussion 1

To prepare:
• Review and complete at least two leadership inventories from the Learning Resources or that your place of employment recommends or uses. (My place of employment is Washington County Opportunities Inc. Head Start)
• Carefully consider and reflect on your personal values and ethics. What personal factors are most important to you in decision making? How do these factors serve as a compass as you navigate challenging situations, relationships with others, and decision making?
Consider the characteristics, approaches, styles, traits, and/or attitudes you most hope to exemplify as a leader in the field of early childhood education. As you reflect on these, draw on your personal goals, as well as those advanced in theory and research on effective leadership.

8085 Module 2 Discussion 1: Leading Your Own Professional Development

Developing as a professional and as a leader is a lifelong journey that requires careful reflection, concentrated attention, and dedication to learning not only who you are currently as a leader, but what your leadership goals are. This process requires taking careful inventory of your values and guiding principles, as well as learning about your areas of current strength, opportunities for growth, and how to utilize resources available to you to support your ongoing development.

For this Discussion, you will inventory your own leadership qualities and then carefully reflect on what you see as areas of strength and development. Keeping in mind the emerging issues and changing needs within the field of early childhood education, you will use knowledge of who you are presently as a leader to discuss with your colleagues the characteristics, approaches, styles, traits, and/or the attitudes you most hope to exemplify in the future.

To prepare:

· Review and complete at least two leadership inventories from the Learning Resources or that your place of employment recommends or uses. (
My place of employment is Washington County Opportunities Inc. Head Start)

· Carefully consider and reflect on your personal values and ethics. What personal factors are most important to you in decision making? How do these factors serve as a compass as you navigate challenging situations, relationships with others, and decision making?

Consider the characteristics, approaches, styles, traits, and/or attitudes you most hope to exemplify as a leader in the field of early childhood education. As you reflect on these, draw on your personal goals, as well as those advanced in theory and research on effective leadership.


Assignment Task Part 1

Write a 2-page analysis in which you do the following:

· Identify the leadership inventories you took.

· Summarize the insights gained from these inventories by describing how your results compare to your current leadership approach(es) and/or the type of leader you hope to become.

· Compare and contrast your personal leadership goals and those advanced in theory and research on effective leadership.

· Based on your summary of your inventory and description of the impact of your values and ethics, create four to five leadership principles that embody essential, effective leadership in early childhood settings. A leadership principle is a statement that includes or emphasizes a specific leadership quality, characteristic, approach, or style. It may also be a statement that emphasizes a trait or attitude that effective leaders embody.

· Justify the relevance of each of your principles by describing how these principles are contextually relevant within the field of early childhood education and supportive of your goals as a leader.

· Finally, explain where you are developmentally with regard to the principles. What do you see as current strengths, and what do you feel would benefit from additional knowledge and practice?

·

Note: Be sure to cite appropriate references in APA format to substantiate your thinking


Assignment Task Part 2

Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

Respond to one or more of your colleagues’ postings in the following ways
in 150 word response:

· Provide additional insights related to at least one of your colleague’s principles and its unique influence on the context of and leadership in the early childhood field.

· Propose strategies for developing the leadership principles your colleague identified as needing more knowledge and practice.

· Note: Be sure to cite appropriate references in APA format to substantiate your thinking

Assignment Task Part 3

·
Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

·
Respond to one or more of your colleagues’ postings in the following ways
in 150 word response:

· Provide additional insights related to at least one of your colleague’s principles and its unique influence on the context of, and leadership in, the early childhood field.

· Propose strategies for developing the leadership principles your colleague identified as needing more knowledge and practice.

· Share why you would, or would not, recommend specific leadership inventories. Explain how the inventories challenged and inspired your thinking. Explain whether the inventories did or did not provide you with the kind of information about leadership and/or your personal leadership abilities that you were expecting.

Note: Be sure to cite appropriate references in APA format to substantiate your thinking


Learning Resources

https://www.td.org/Publications/Magazines/TD/TD-Archive/2012/08/Intelligence-360-Instruments-Are-the-Most-Popular-Way-to-Assess-Leadership

https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=poh&AN=87803879&site=ehost-live&scope=site&authtype=shib&custid=s6527200

https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ1017623&site=eds-live&scope=site&authtype=shib&custid=s6527200

https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edb&AN=87786454&site=eds-live&scope=site&authtype=shib&custid=s6527200

http://hepg.org/hel-home/issues/28_2/helarticle/four-steps-to-building-leadership-capacity_530

Learning Resources

Required Resources

Abell, E., Arsiwalla, D. D., Putnam, R. I., & Miller, E. B. (2014). Mentoring and facilitating professional engagement as quality enhancement strategies: An overview and evaluation of the family child care partnerships program. Child & Youth Care Forum, 43(5), 569–592. doi:10.1007/s10566-014-9254-1

Brotherton, P. (2012). 360 instruments are the most popular way to assess leadership. Retrieved from https://www.td.org/Publications/Magazines/TD/TD-Archive/2012/08/Intelligence-360-Instruments-Are-the-Most-Popular-Way-to-Assess-Leadership

Community Foundations of Canada. (n.d.). Diversity at work: Creating an inclusive and supportive work environment. Retrieved December 6, 2016, from http://hrcouncil.ca/hr-toolkit/diversity-supportive-environment.cfm

Cable, D. M., Gino, F., & Staats, B. R. (2013). Breaking them in or eliciting their best? Reframing socialization around newcomers’ authentic self-expression. Administrative Science Quarterly, 58(1), 1–36. doi:10.1177/0001839213477098

Campbell-Evans, G., Stamopoulos, E., & Maloney, C. (2014). Building leadership capacity in early childhood pre-service teachers. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 39(5), 42–49. doi:10.14221/ajte.2014v39n5.3

Cherrington, S. & Thornton, K. (2013). Continuing professional development in early childhood education in New Zealand, Early Years, 33(2), 119-132, DOI:10.1080/09575146.2013.763770

Choy, S., Billett, S., & Kelly, A. (2013). Engaging in continuing education and training: Learning preferences of worker-learners in the health and community services industry. Australian Journal of Adult Learning, 53(1), 68. 

Doherty, G., Ferguson, T. M., Ressler, G., & Lomotey, J. (2015). Enhancing child care quality by director training and collegial mentoring. Early Childhood Research and Practice, 17(1). 

Göncü, A., Main, C., Perone, A., & Tozer, S. (2014). Crossing the boundaries: The need to integrate school leadership and early childhood education. Mid-Western Educational Researcher, 26(1), 66–75. 

Hewes, R. P., & Patterson, A. M. (2012). A three-pronged approach to leadership development. Training & Development, 66(9), 52–56. 

Kirtman, L. (2012). Four steps to building leadership capacity. Retrieved from http://hepg.org/hel-home/issues/28_2/helarticle/four-steps-to-building-leadership-capacity_530

Krome, M. A. (2014). Knowledge transformation: A case for workforce diversity. Journal of Diversity Management (Online), 9(2), 103–110. 

Martin, G. C. (2014). The effects of cultural diversity in the workplace. Journal of Diversity Management (Online), 9(2), 89–92. doi:10.19030/jdm.v9i2.8974

Pfaff, L. A., Boatwright, K. J., Potthoff, A. L., Finan, C., Ulrey, L. A., & Huber, D. M. (2013). Perceptions of women and men leaders following 360‐degree feedback evaluations. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 26(1), 35–56. doi: 0.1002/piq.2113

Russ, T. L. (2012). The relationship between communication apprehension and learning preferences in an organizational setting. Journal of Business Communication, 49(4), 312–331. doi:10.1177/0021943612456035

Stamopoulos, E. (2015). The professional leadership and action research training model: Supporting early childhood leadership. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 40(4), 39–48. 

Tashacova, O. (2011). Workplace communication and cultural diversity. Retrieved from http://diversityintheworkplace.ca/wordpress/2011/12/01/workplace-communication-and-cultural-diversity/

UCSF Human Resources. (n.d.). Chapter 12: Managing diversity in the workplace. Retrieved December 6, 2016, from http://ucsfhr.ucsf.edu/index.php/pubs/hrguidearticle/chapter-12-managing-diversity-in-the-workplace/

Watson, S. (2016). How podcasting works. Retrieved from http://computer.howstuffworks.com/internet/basics/podcasting.htm

Optional Resources

Note: The sources below are potential resources/tools/inventories for you to explore as you seek ways to better understand your leadership skills, behaviors, styles, and approaches. You do not have to use any of these and you do not have to purchase a leadership inventory for the purpose of this course. Take time to review the listed sources and also ask others for their recommendations.

Leading and Following.com. (2016). The leadership profile (TLP & TLP-IC). Retrieved from  http://www.leadingandfollowing.com/TLP.html

LPI: Leadership practices inventory. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.pfeiffer.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-811878.html

McRel International. (2016). Balanced leadership profile: An instructional leadership resource. Retrieved from http://blp.changetheodds.org/

Mind Tools Editorial Team. (2016). The leadership motivation assessment. Retrieved from http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_01.htm

North Dakota Council of Education Leaders. (2016). Education leadership profile. Retrieved from http://www.ndcel.org/Page/389

Note: You will need to use the paper version of this leadership profile.

North Dakota Lead Center. (2016). 21st century school administrator skills assessment. Retrieved from http://www.ndcel.org/site/Default.aspx?PageID=388

Note: Please use the paper version.

Team Leadership Services. (2016). Leadership behavours profile (LBP) – A tool for personal leadership development. Retrieved from http://www.tls360.com/in-touch/issue5.as

4

>

Assignment Task Part

2

Read

 

a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

Respond to

1

of your colleagues’ postings in the following ways of 12

5

word responses:

· Provide additional insights related to at least one of your colleague’s principles and its unique influence on the context of and leadership in the early childhood field.

·

Propose strategies for developing the leadership principles your colleague identified as needing more knowledge and practice.

Note: Be sure to cite appropriate references in APA format to substantiate your thinking.


Katheryn Gonzales

Leadership Motivation Assessment

  

          The Leadership Motivation Assessment assessed my motivation and desire to lead others. Motivation to lead is a crucial factor in becoming an effective leader that can motivate others toward a vision or mission. According to the Leadership Motivation Assessment, I scored 4

9

points out of

7

0. My score of 49 points falls under the category of being uncertain in my motivation to lead. Honestly, this result does not surprise me. I rarely see myself as a leader but as a worker who works alongside my team to benefit the whole school. I like to encourage others and work toward a common goal. However, I do not think my ideas have to be followed or are important to share (Mind Tools Editorial Team, 201

6

).

            The next inventory I took was an assessment based on Harrison & Killion’s (2007) 
Ten Roles for Teacher Leaders. This article breaks down the ten roles of teacher leaders. These roles are Resource Provider, Instructional Specialist, Curriculum Specialist, Classroom Supporter, Learning Facilitator,

Mentor

, School Leader, Data Coach, Catalyst for Change, and

Learner

. Teachers wear many hats around the school; each role is critical to a school’s success. I rated myself from 1 to

10

, with ten being the most comfortable in the teacher leader role and one being the least comfortable. The order I ranked myself is:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 2

3

4 5 6 7

8

9 10

Resource provider

8

Instructional specialist

9

Curriculum specialist

2

Classroom supporter

4

Learning facilitator

1

Mentor

 

 

5

School leader

6

Data coach

7

Catalyst for change

3

Learner

10

 

            I am the most comfortable as a learner. This role allows me to model a commitment to lifelong learning, the desire to improve continually and to share what I learn with students. I am least comfortable with the role of learning facilitator. This role requires the teacher leader to facilitate professional learning among staff members to impact student outcomes. I am uncomfortable in this role because I still feel as though I am learning and am not in the position to teach others that may have taught way longer than myself.

            The type of leadership style that I want to have is the democratic/participative leadership style. I like this style of leadership because this leader makes decisions but also includes member participation. This leader involves the team in the decision-making process, allowing team members to develop their skills and become more involved in the process. The results from the inventories I took align with the leadership style I enjoy. The Leadership Motivational survey indicates that I am not highly motivated to lead. I don’t enjoy being the one making decisions alone. I like to have input from others that may have more knowledge than me, and I want everyone to feel like the team worked together for a common goal (Amanchukwu et al., 2015).

            The 
Ten Roles of Teacher Leaders inventory helps me to understand that I am comfortable in a learning role and not comfortable leading other educators in professional development. This assessment aligns with the leadership style that I find most appealing. I want to encourage others to share their knowledge, and I hope to be a leader that cultivates leadership in others. The learner in me gets excited to share what I have learned with others and learn what others are doing in their effective classrooms.

Based on the summary of my leadership inventories, I have found that these principles are effective in the early childcare setting.

· Make child development, learning, and growth the priority.

Children are the business; they are the priority in everything we do. Great leaders understand their “why” and keep their vision and mission the focus. Student success is the priority (Lewis & Hill, 2016).

Empower teachers to be essential aspects of student success. It takes a team.

Good leaders also understand that it takes a team. As a result, collaborating with teachers in the building and involving them in influencing programs is essential to successful leadership.

Use research-based strategies to impact teacher professional development.

Influential leaders use research-based strategies and programs to build teacher professional development. Teachers that perform well are more likely to improve student outcomes. Good leaders understand that giving teachers opportunities to develop their skills through professional development will positively impact students (
5 Effective Principal Leadership Styles, 2020).

Build authentic and nurturing relationships with families.

Influential leaders understand the importance of building relationships with families and the community. These relationships are most effective when genuine and equitable (Lewis & Hill, 2016).

            Regarding these principles, my strengths are that I enjoy learning and using research-based strategies and skills to improve my teaching. I am also strong in building relationships with my students and their families. I encourage culturally responsive teaching and embrace equity in the classroom. I also believe in the importance of developmentally appropriate practices that are good for young children and understand the importance of making child development and learning a priority. However, I would benefit from building confidence in leading other teachers in professional development.

References

5 Effective Principal Leadership Styles. (2020, April 21). Soeonline.american.edu. https://soeonline.american.edu/blog/principal-leadership-styles

Amanchukwu, R.N., Stanley, G.J., & Ololube, N.P. (2015). A review of leadership theories, principles and styles and their relevance to educational management. Management, 5(1), 6-14. Doi: 10.5923/j.mm.20150501.02

Harrison, C., & Killion, J. (2007, September 1). 
Ten Roles for Teacher Leaders. ASCD.

https://www.ascd.org/el/articles/ten-roles-for-teacher-leaders

Lewis, J., & Hill, J. (2016). What does leadership look like in early childhood settings?

            

http://thespoke.earlychildhoodaustrailia.org.au/leadership-look-like-early-childhood-

    

            settings/

Mind Tools Editorial Team. (2016). The leadership motivation assessment.  http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_01.htm

 
 

Assignment Task Part 3

Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

Respond to one of your colleagues’ postings in the following ways of 150 words response:

Provide additional insights related to at least one of your colleague’s principles and its unique influence on the context of, and leadership in, the early childhood field.

Propose strategies for developing the leadership principles your colleague identified as needing more knowledge and practice.

Share why you would, or would not, recommend specific leadership inventories. Explain how the inventories challenged and inspired your thinking. Explain whether the inventories did or did not provide you with the kind of information about leadership and/or your personal leadership abilities that you were expecting.

Note: Be sure to cite appropriate references in APA format to substantiate your thinking.


Kelli Barnes

For this week’s discussion, I evaluated myself using two different leadership inventories.  The first was the Leadership Motivation Assessment (Mind Tools Editorial Team, 2016).  This assessment analyzed the motivation that drives effective leadership. Taking initiatives and stepping out in a leadership role often requires a strength of someone willing to lead the charge. Out of a total of 70 possible points, I scored a 62.  This placed me in the bracket of “strong motivation to lead”. As current grade chair and team leader at my school, I agree with this score.  I have genuine concern for each member of my team, support them in each aspect possible, and value their input that they bring to our professional learning community. In addition, my organizational skills compliment my motivation in leading my team. I enjoy sharing new ideas, while hearing the ideas of each of my team members.

In addition to the Leadership Motivation Assessment, I took the assessment provided online by 
Ten Roles for Teachers, by Harrison and Killion (2007). This assessment was different.  It examined the different roles that teachers have and how they are best suited for each. These roles include resource provider, instructional specialist, curriculum specialist, classroom supporter, learning facilitator, mentor, school leader, data coach, and catalyst for change. This assessment ranks teacher comfort level from 1, being least comfortable, to 10, being the most comfortable with that role.  I have scored myself on the chart below.

  

            As a current school leader, I find comfort in being the mentor that my grade level needs, the classroom supporter that is always able to share and listen to new ideas and strategies for learning, and data coach.  In addition, my tenure provides ample instructional support for new teachers. This assessment tool brought to my attention the leadership that I currently display and possible areas for personal growth. Although I do feel quite comfortable supporting teachers in classroom management, instruction, and even data collection, I do not find strength in knowing each avenue of the ever-changing curriculum.  Thus, it is vital to have teachers with strengths in each area to compliment a strong team. I enjoy being a cheerleader for my team and listening to new ideas from each member.  I strive to be a leadership that not only effectively leads with confidence but is willing to listen with an open ear to change and exciting new ideas.  After completing the inventory assessments and reflecting on my own beliefs on leadership, I have arrived at these principles that I find are essential in early childhood education.

· Never stop learning.

On-going professional learning is essential to stay abreast with the latest educational trends and what will support our teachers, students, and communities the best.

 Use reflective practices

Be available and open to making changes to solve problems and realign focus when needed.

Be an early learning advocate for your school and community

Children and their learning the main priorities for early childhood education programs (Lewis & Hill, 2016). Therefore, is it critical that we as leaders hold children at the forefront of what matters most.  Children are why we do what we do!

Prioritize quality and be available

Present leadership as a tool that promotes the best teachers, staff, and school facilities because our students and their families deserve it.  Lastly, don’t forget to always be available.  Be available for parents, teachers, and even those students who may need a hug on hard days.

 
 
References
 

Harrison, C., & Killion, J. (2007, September 1). 
Ten Roles for Teacher Leaders. ASCD. 
https://www.ascd.org/el/articles/ten-roles-for-teacher-leaders

Lewis, J., & Hill, J. (2016). What does leadership look like in early childhood settings?
            
http://thespoke.earlychildhoodaustrailia.org.au/leadership-look-like-early-childhood-    

            settings/
 
Mind Tools Editorial Team. (2016). The leadership motivation assessment.  http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_01.htm

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