Posted: June 11th, 2022

Aligning Objectives to Standards

Assessment Description
Instruction planning requires well-written learning objectives. A learning objective must be specific to the content being presented, measurable, and attainable by students within the restrictions of the class. Clear learning objectives keep the instruction focused and help the students understand the learning expectations. Learning objectives must also be aligned to academic standards. Accurate alignment will guide instructional planning and enhance student academic success.
Aligning learning objectives to state standards is an important part in developing a unit of study. Units of study can last for several days, weeks, or longer.
Use the “STEM Unit Plan” template to create a 5-day STEM unit plan. Your unit plan will focus on your content area, including cross-disciplinary content from all STEM subjects.
Select a concept within your content area on which to focus and create an appropriate and descriptive title for your unit. Complete the first five rows of the “STEM Unit Plan” template.
P.S: Science is my content area.
ATTACHED FILE(S)
GCU College of Education
LESSON UNIT PLAN TEMPLATE
STEM Unit Plan
Title of Unit and Brief Summary:
Create a title for each lesson and 1-2 sentences summarizing the lesson, identifying the central focus based on the content and skills you are teaching.

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Title of Lesson and Brief Rationale
Create a title for each lesson and 1-2 sentences describing the rationale of the lesson and how it will integrate multiple STEM content areas

State-Specific Standards
List specific grade-level state standards that teach and assess multiple science content areas.

Next Generation Science Standard
Identify which Next Generation Science Standards align with state standards.

Learning Objectives
Based on state standards and NGSS, what will be the purpose and focus of the activity? Describe the learning content to be covered.

Unit Resources (including technology) that would be included in the unit.

APA Citations
(include APA citation for each above Unit Resource)

Resources Rationale
Describe the purpose of the resource and its value in the lesson.

Knowledge and Skills
Specific knowledge and skills students demonstrate based on the day’s activities.

Academic Language and Vocabulary
Content-specific vocabulary included in the lesson.

Summary of Activities for the Lesson
Observable student learning activities and how they are aligned to state standards.

Formative Assessments
Assessments used to monitor student progress and modify instruction.

© 2018. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved.
© 2018. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved

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Shelby County Schools Science Vision
Shelby County Schools’ vision of science education is to ensure that from early childhood to the end of the 12th grade, all students have heightened curiosity and an increased
wonder of science; possess sufficient knowledge of science and engineering to engage in discussions; are able to learn and apply scientific and technological information in their
everyday lives; and have the skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, and communication to enter careers of their choice, while having access to connections to science,
engineering, and technology.
To achieve this, Shelby County Schools has employed The Tennessee Academic Standards for Science to craft meaningful curricula that is innovative and provide a myriad of
learning opportunities that extend beyond mastery of basic scientific principles.
Introduction
In 2014, the Shelby County Schools Board of Education adopted a set of ambitious, yet attainable goals for school and student performance. The District is committed to these
goals, as further described in our strategic plan, Destination 2025.In order to achieve these ambitious goals, we must collectively work to provide our students with high quality
standards aligned instruction. The Tennessee Academic Standards for Science provide a common set of expectations for what students will know and be able to do at the end of
each grade, can be located in the Tennessee Science Standards Reference. Tennessee Academic Standards for Science are rooted in the knowledge and skills that students need
to succeed in post-secondary study or careers. While the academic standards establish desired learning outcomes, the curricula provide instructional planning designed to help
students reach these outcomes. The curriculum maps contain components to ensure that instruction focuses students toward college and career readiness.Educators will use
this guide and the standards as a roadmap for curriculum and instruction.The sequence of learning is strategically positioned so that necessary foundational skills are spiraled in
order to facilitate student mastery of the standards.
Our collective goal is to ensure our students graduate ready for college and career. Being College and Career Ready entails, many aspects of teaching and learning. We want our
students to apply their scientific learning in the classroom and beyond. These valuable experiences include students being facilitators of their own learning through problem
solving and thinking critically. The Science and Engineering Practices are valuable tools used by students to engage in understanding how scientific knowledge develops. These
practices rest on important “processes and proficiencies” with longstanding importance in science education.The science maps contain components to ensure that instruction
focuses students toward understanding how science and engineering can contribute to meeting many of the major challenges that confront society today.The maps are
centered around five basic components:the Tennessee Academic Standards for Science, Science and Engineering Practices, Disciplinary Core Ideas, Crosscutting Concepts, and
Phenomena.
The Tennessee Academic Standards for Science were developed using the National Research Council’s 2012 publication, A Framework for K-12 Science Education as their
foundation.The framework presents a new model for science instruction that is a stark contrast to what has come to be the norm in science classrooms. Thinking about science
had become memorizing concepts and solving mathematical formulae. Practicing science had become prescribed lab situations with predetermined outcomes. The framework
proposes a three-dimensional approach to science education that capitalizes on a child’s natural curiosity.The Science Framework for K-12 Science Education provides the
blueprint for developing the effective science practices. The Framework expresses a vision in science education that requires students to operate at the nexus of three
dimensions of learning: Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas. The Framework identified a small number of disciplinary core
ideas that all students should learn with increasing depth and sophistication, from kindergarten through grade twelve. Key to the vision expressed in the Framework is for
https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/education/standards/sci/sci_standards_reference.pdf
https://www.nap.edu/catalog/13165/a-framework-for-k-12-science-education-practices-crosscutting-concepts

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students to learn these disciplinary core ideas in the context of science and engineering practices. The importance of combining Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting
Concepts and Disciplinary Core Ideas is stated in the Framework as follows:
Standards and performance expectations that are aligned to the framework must take into account that students cannot fully understand scientific and engineering ideas without
engaging in the practices of inquiry and the discourses by which such ideas are developed and refined.At the same time, they cannot learn or show competence in practices
except in the context of specific content. (NRC Framework, 2012, p. 218)
To develop the skills and dispositions to use scientific and engineering practices needed to further their learning and to solve problems, students need to experience instruction
in which they use multiple practices in developing a particular core idea and apply each practice in the context of multiple core ideas. We use the term “practices” instead of a
term such as “skills” to emphasize that engaging in scientific investigation requires not only skill but also knowledge that is specific to each practice. Students in grades K-12
should engage in all eight practices over each grade band. Crosscutting concepts have application across all domains of science. As such, they are a way of linking the different
domains of science. Crosscutting concepts have value because they provide students with connections and intellectual tools that are related across the differing areas of
disciplinary content and can enrich their application of practices and their understanding of core ideas.There are seven crosscutting concepts that bridge disciplinary
boundaries, uniting core ideas throughout the fields of science and engineering. Their purpose is to help students deepen their understanding of the disciplinary core ideas and
develop a coherent and scientifically based view of the world.
The map is meant to support effective planning and instruction to rigorous standards. It is not meant to replace teacher planning, prescribe pacing or instructional practice.In
fact, our goal is not to merely “cover the curriculum,” but rather to “uncover” it by developing students’ deep understanding of the content and mastery of the
standards.Teachers who are knowledgeable about and intentionally align the learning target (standards and objectives), topic, text(s), task, and needs (and assessment) of the
learners are best positioned to make decisions about how to support student learning toward such mastery. Teachers are therefore expected–with the support of their
colleagues, coaches, leaders, and other support providers–to exercise their professional judgment aligned to our shared vision of effective instruction, the Teacher Effectiveness
Measure (TEM) and related best practices.However, while the framework allows for flexibility and encourages each teacher/teacher team to make it their own, our
expectations for student learning are non-negotiable.We must ensure all our children have access to rigor—high-quality teaching and learning to grade level specific standards,
including purposeful support of literacy and language learning across the content areas.

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Learning Progression
At the end of the elementary science experience, students can observe and measure phenomena using appropriate tools.They are able to organize objects and ideas into broad
concepts first by single properties and later by multiple properties.They can create and interpret graphs and models that explain phenomena.Students can keep notebooks to
record sequential observations and identify simple patterns.They are able to design and conduct investigations, analyze results, and communicate the results to others.
Students will carry their curiosity, interest and enjoyment of the scientific world view, scientific inquiry, and the scientific enterprise into middle school.
At the end of the middle school science experience, students can discover relationships by making observations and by the systematic gathering of data.They can identify
relevant evidence and valid arguments.Their focus has shifted from the general to the specific and from the simple to the complex.They use scientific information to make
wise decision related to conservation of the natural world.They recognize that there are both negative and positive implications to new technologies.
As an SCS graduate, former students should be literate in science, understand key science ideas, aware that science and technology are interdependent human enterprises with
strengths and limitations, familiar with the natural world and recognizes both its diversity and unity, and able to apply scientific knowledge and ways of thinking for individual
and social purposes.

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Structure of the Standards
• Grade Level/Course Overview: An overview that describes that specific content and themes for each grade level or high school course.
• Disciplinary Core Idea: Scientific and foundational ideas that permeate all grades and connect common themes that bridge scientific disciplines.
• Standard: Statements of what students can do to demonstrate knowledge of the conceptual understanding. Each performance indicator includes a specific science and
engineering practice paired with the content knowledge and skills that students should demonstrate to meet the grade level or high school course standards.

Purpose of Science Curriculum Maps
This map is a guide to help teachers and their support providers (e.g., coaches, leaders) on their path to effective, college and career ready (CCR) aligned instruction and our
pursuit of Destination 2025.It is a resource for organizing instruction around the Tennessee Academic Standards for Science, which define what to teach and what students
need to learn at each grade level. The map is designed to reinforce the grade/course-specific standards and content (scope) and provides suggested sequencing, pacing, time
frames, and aligned resources. Our hope is that by curating and organizing a variety of standards-aligned resources, teachers will be able to spend less time wondering what to
teach and searching for quality materials (though they may both select from and/or supplement those included here) and have more time to plan, teach, assess, and reflect with
colleagues to continuously improve practice and best meet the needs of their students.
The map is meant to support effective planning and instruction to rigorous standards. It is not meant to replace teacher planning, prescribe pacing or instructional practice.In
fact, our goal is not to merely “cover the curriculum,” but rather to “uncover” it by developing students’ deep understanding of the content and mastery of the
standards.Teachers who are knowledgeable about and intentionally align the learning target (standards and objectives), topic, text(s), task, and needs (and assessment) of the
learners are best positioned to make decisions about how to support student learning toward such mastery. Teachers are therefore expected–with the support of their
colleagues, coaches, leaders, and other support providers–to exercise their professional judgment aligned to our shared vision of effective instruction, the Teacher Effectiveness
Measure (TEM) and related best practices.However, while the framework allows for flexibility and encourages each teacher/teacher team to make it their own, our
expectations for student learning are non-negotiable.We must ensure all our children have access to rigor—high-quality teaching and learning to grade level specific standards,
including purposeful support of literacy and language learning across the content areas.

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Suggested Station Rotation Activities
Teacher Led Whole Group (start of class)
Prior to releasing the students into their initial station, the teacher will address them whole group. This time will be used to introduce the lesson, discuss the
TN Academic Standard(s) for Science. Annotate the performance-based objective(s) and familiarize the students with the academic vocabulary.

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Teacher Led Station

Online Station
(Tech-Infused)
Offline Station
(Small Group Collaboration)
The teacher could utilize this time for such tasks as
listed below:
During students’ time at this station, the teacher
could engage their students in any of the tasks
found below:
During students’ time at this station, the teacher
could engage their students in any of the tasks
found below:

Tasks
• Modeling a task/skill needed in the lesson.
• Having a class discussion about that evening’s
HW assignment, or morning’s BW assignment.
Ensuring that students understand the
concepts covered in the lesson.
• Conducting a teacher demo (brief quick labs)
• Face to face chat with students to answer
questions and address misconceptions.
• Teacher facilitated discussion. Teacher can
prompt students with open-ended questions
to gauge mastery and conceptual
understanding of students.
• Flipgrid (teacher could leave a video recording
of instructions, specific details surrounding
the tasks provided at this station)
• Self-paced Nearpod lesson
• Conduct research
• Create presentations (PowerPoint, Sway)
• Collaborative tasks on Padlet
• Kahoot (quizzes, CFU)
• Quizlet
• FLVS (Florida Virtual School in the Canvas
Platform).
• Students can engage in a learning opportunity
in EdPuzzlehttps://bit.ly/3djEFOU
• Students can engage in an online simulations
or interactives such as,
o PhET Simulations
o Virtual Labs

• Flipgrid (teacher could leave a video recording
of instructions, specific details surrounding
the tasks provided at this station)
• Read, annotate a scientific text
• Conduct research
• Performance Tasks
• Group discussions (Teacher can have a
prompt posted at the station to guide student
discussions.)
• Writing tasks (Read a scientific text and write
a summary, reflection, construct an
explanation, indicate cause and effect, argue
from evidence).
• Student presentations
• Independent tasks (Read a scientific text,
write a reflection)
• Inquiry Labs
• Collaborative tasks (projects)
• Interactive Notebooks (composition
Notebooks)

https://bit.ly/3djEFOU

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Resources

Area in the class that the teacher can interface
with a small group of students.
• Laptops, desktops, computer lab
• Microsoft Forms
• Microsoft Teams (Class Notebook)
• Padlet https://bit.ly/2RC7zBA
• Nearpod https://bit.ly/3uSjk55
• Flipgrid https://bit.ly/32hOJ4F
• Kahoot https://bit.ly/2OVAaRo
• Florida Virtual Schools (in Canvas)
• HMH ThinkCentral https://clever.com/in/scs
Printed articles, scientific journals, textbooks.
*These resources are online so the teacher can
provide printed copies of text from the following
sources:
Newsela https://bit.ly/3acZ06O
DOGO news https://bit.ly/3skpXLX
Scholastic Classroom Magazine
https://bit.ly/2RDMeHW
Science News for Students https://bit.ly/3uTNwNf

Supplementary resources to support each station can be found by clicking on the Additional Resources section of each lesson within this curriculum map.
Teacher Led Whole Group (Class Wrap-Up)
The teacher will wrap up the lesson and provide details/instruction on homework if assigned. Answer any lingering questions that students may have. Give students an exit
ticket.
o Modeling a task/skill needed for the next days’ lesson.
o Discussing that evening’s HW assignment. Ensuring that students understand the task.
o Modeling a task/skill needed for the homework to be assigned that evening.
https://bit.ly/2RC7zBA
https://bit.ly/3uSjk55
https://bit.ly/32hOJ4F
https://bit.ly/2OVAaRo
https://clever.com/in/scs
https://bit.ly/3acZ06O
https://bit.ly/3skpXLX
https://bit.ly/2RDMeHW
https://bit.ly/3uTNwNf

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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s
Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 4: Earth’s Resources (3 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How do the Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?
Unit 4, Lesson 1 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Nonrenewable Resources 1 week How do we use nonrenewable energy resources? energy resource, nuclear energy, fossil fuel, fission
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS3: Earth and Human Activity

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS3.1 Differentiate between renewable and
nonrenewable resources by asking questions about their
availability and sustainability.

Explanation(s)and Support of Standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS3.1 Renewable resources are resources that can be
regenerated within a human lifetime. While this then
infers that non-renewable resources must develop over
longer periods of time. Beyond mere memorization of
those parameters, students should recognize that the
processes that create mineral, groundwater, and energy
(fuels) happen at geologic rates as a result of geologic
Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS3.1
SWBAT ask questions about renewable and
nonrenewable resources IOT identify where humans get
their resources and patterns in distribution.

SWBAT define problems related to using resources that
are limited IOT explain how resources are not stable and
can change over time.

SWBAT construct explanations and design solutions
about renewable and nonrenewable resources IOT
differentiate between them based on availability and
sustainability.

SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about the distribution of resources around earth IOT
Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 4, Lesson 3 pp. 268-
281
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 243
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 243
• Looking Ahead Probing Questions, TE p. 270
Explore
Energy Resources
• Modeling Nonrenewable Resources Quick Lab, TE
p. 271
• How Can We Measure the Impact of
Nonrenewable Energy? Virtual Lab, TE p. 271
Explain
Energy Resources
• Do the Math #5, SE p. 244
• Compare #6, SE p. 244
Fossil Fuels
• Think Outside the Book #8, SE p. 246
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

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processes. Because geologic processes do not occur
uniformly, there is not a uniform distribution of
resources. (e.g., oil deposits in the middle east, coal
deposits in the western United States, gold deposits in
California, the use of Tennessee waterways for
hydroelectric power generation.) As humans use
nonrenewable resources, they are restored, but in
amounts of time that greatly exceed those of near
generations. Thus, these resources are considered
limited.

It is not intended that students memorize the processes
for the formation of all non-renewables, but rather to
understand that they are in some way connected to
geologic processes. A limited number of examples can be
used to establish this idea.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
6.ESS3.1

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Cause and Effect 6.ESS3.1
explain the cause and effect relationship of geologic rate
and geologic processes.

Learning Outcomes
• Differentiate between renewable and nonrenewable
resources.
• Describe the characteristics of fossil fuels and
advantages and disadvantages of using them.
• Explain how nuclear energy is created and used to
generate electricity.
• Explain the advantages and disadvantages of using
nuclear energy.

• Active Reading #9, SE p. 247
• Active Reading #11, SE p. 248
Nuclear Energy
• Compare #12, SE p. 249
• Active Reading #13, SE p. 250
• Visualize It! #14, SE p. 250
• Evaluate #15, SE p. 251
• Is It Safe? Discussion, TE p. 270
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Process Chart Graphic Organizer, TE p. 274
• Visual Summary, SE p. 252
Going Further
• Health Connection, TE p. 274
• Physical Science Connection, TE p. 274
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 275
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 253
Summative Assessment
• Nonrenewable Energy Resources Alternative
Assessment, TE p. 275
• Lesson Quiz
The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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Suggested Phenomenon

The Earth has many natural resources that can be
renewed in our lifetime, however, many cannot. Discuss
this idea with students, giving them time to generate and
record ideas.

Click on the picture to find out how a dairy farm is using
a methane digester to turn cow poop into electricity.
Students can complete a See Think Wonder Template
after watching the video.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s
Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 4: Earth’s Resources (3 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How do the Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?
Unit 4, Lesson 2 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Renewable Energy
Resources
1 week How do humans use renewable energy resources?
energy resources, hydroelectric energy, wind energy,
biomass, solar energy, geothermal energy
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS3: Earth and Human Activity

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS3.1 Differentiate between renewable and
nonrenewable resources by asking questions about their
availability and sustainability.

6.ESS3.2 Investigate and compare existing and
developing technologies that will utilize renewable and
alternate energy sources.

Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS3.1
SWBAT ask questions about renewable and
nonrenewable resources IOT identify where humans get
their resources and patterns in distribution.

SWBAT define problems related to using resources that
are limited IOT explain how resources are not stable and
can change over time.

SWBAT construct explanations and design solutions
about renewable and nonrenewable resources IOT
differentiate between them based on availability and
sustainability.

Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 4, Lesson 4 pp. 282-
295
Engage
• New Again Activity, TE p. 284
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 257
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 257
• Pick Your Resources Daily Demo, TE p. 285
Explore
Energy Resources
• How Can We Use Renewable Energy Resources
Virtual Lab, TE p. 285
Energy from the Sun
• Design a Turbine Quick Lab, TE p. 284
• Understanding Solar Panels Quick Lab, TE p. 285
Explain
Energy Resources
• Contrast #5, SE p. 258
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5

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Explanation(s)and Support of Standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS3.1 Renewable resources are resources that can be
regenerated within a human lifetime. While this then
infers that non-renewable resources must develop over
longer periods of time. Beyond mere memorization of
those parameters, students should recognize that the
processes that create mineral, groundwater, and energy
(fuels) happen at geologic rates as a result of geologic
processes. Because geologic processes do not occur
uniformly, there is not a uniform distribution of
resources. (e.g., oil deposits in the middle east, coal
deposits in the western United States, gold deposits in
California, the use of Tennessee waterways for
hydroelectric power generation.) As humans use
nonrenewable resources, they are restored, but in
amounts of time that greatly exceed those of near
generations. Thus, these resources are considered
limited.

It is not intended that students memorize the processes
for the formation of all non-renewables, but rather to
understand that they are in some way connected to
geologic processes. A limited number of examples can be
used to establish this idea.

6.ESS3.2 Utilization of natural resources involves
weighing environmental, economic, and oftentimes
political conversations. Environmental discussions should
include models which help to predict effects and gains of
using a natural resource on the environment. Economic
considerations include the amount of energy which can
be harvested for the cost. For example, the economy of
installing residential photovoltaic systems depends on
the availability of sunlight in a person’s location or on
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about the distribution of resources around earth IOT
explain the cause and effect relationship of geologic rate
and geologic processes.

6.ESS3.2
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about the pros and cons for specific renewable energy
sources IOT explain the benefits of renewable energy
sources and their impacts on the environment and
ecosystems.

SWBAT create an argument from evidence comparing
existing and developing technologies that will utilize
renewable and alternate energy sources IOT explain the
effects and gains of using a natural resource on the
environment.

Learning Outcomes
• Describe how humans use energy resources.
• Explain the difference between renewable and
nonrenewable energy resources.
• Identify the two main kinds of renewable energy
resources.
• Describe solar energy and how it is harnessed and
used.
• Explain how energy from wind and flowing water is
harnessed and used.
• Describe how biomass and alcohol form and how
their energy is harnessed and used.
• Describe what geothermal energy is and how it is
used.

• Distinguish #7, SE p. 259
• Think Outside the Book #8, SE p. 259
Energy from the Sun
• Infer #9, SE p. 260
• Active Reading #10, SE p. 261
• Visualize It! #11, SE p. 261
• Infer #12, SE p. 262
• Visualize It! #14, SE p. 263
• Active Reading #15, SE p. 264
• List #16, SE p. 264
• How It Works Activity, TE p. 284
Energy from Earth
• List #17, SE p. 265
• The Future of Renewables Activity, TE p. 284
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Pyramid Fold Note, TE p. 288
• Visual Summary, SE p. 266
Going Further
• Life Science Connection, TE p. 288
• Social Studies Connection, TE p. 288
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 267
Summative Assessment
• Renewable Energy Resources Alternative
Assessment, TE p. 289
• Lesson Quiz
• Alternate Thinking: Different Forms of Energy
S.T.E.M., TE pp. 296-299

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

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their property. Political conversations are impacted by
considering global distributions of energy sources. As
technologies progress, energy harvesting becomes less
expensive and more efficient such that conversations
regarding the utilization of renewable and alternate
energy sources may shift over time.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
6.ESS3.2
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
6.ESS3.1

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Energy ad Matter 6.ESS3.2
Cause and Effect 6.ESS3.1

Suggested Phenomenon

The Earth has many natural resources that can be
renewed in our lifetime, however, many cannot. Discuss
this idea with students, giving them time to generate and
record ideas.

Click on the picture to find out how a dairy farm is using
a methane digester to turn cow poop into electricity.
Students can complete a See Think Wonder Template
after watching the video.

The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s
Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 4: Earth’s Resources (3 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How do the Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?
Unit 4, Lesson 3 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Managing Resources 1 week Why should natural resources be managed?
natural resource, nonrenewable resource, renewable
resource, conservation, stewardship
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS3: Earth and Human Activity

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS3.1 Differentiate between renewable and
nonrenewable resources by asking questions about their
availability and sustainability.

6.ESS3.2 Investigate and compare existing and developing
technologies that will utilize renewable and alternate
energy sources.

6.ESS3.3 Assess the impacts of human activities on the
biosphere including conservation, habitat management,
species endangerment, and extinction.
Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS3.1
SWBAT ask questions about renewable and
nonrenewable resources IOT identify where humans get
their resources and patterns in distribution.

SWBAT define problems related to using resources that
are limited IOT explain how resources are not stable and
can change over time.

SWBAT construct explanations and design solutions
about renewable and nonrenewable resources IOT
differentiate between them based on availability and
sustainability.

Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 4, Lesson 5 pp. 300-
313
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 275
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 275
Explore
Resources
• The Impact of Resource Extraction Quick Lab, TE
p. 303
Explain
Resources
• Compare #5, SE p. 276
• Visualize It! #6, SE p. 277
• Active Reading #7 SE p. 277
• Visualize It! #s 8-10, SE p. 277
• Renewable or Not? Probing Questions, TE p. 302

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5

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Explanation(s)and Support of standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS3.1 Renewable resources are resources that can be
regenerated within a human lifetime. While this then
infers that non-renewable resources must develop over
longer periods of time. Beyond mere memorization of
those parameters, students should recognize that the
processes that create mineral, groundwater, and energy
(fuels) happen at geologic rates as a result of geologic
processes. Because geologic processes do not occur
uniformly, there is not a uniform distribution of
resources. (e.g., oil deposits in the middle east, coal
deposits in the western United States, gold deposits in
California, the use of Tennessee waterways for
hydroelectric power generation.) As humans use
nonrenewable resources, they are restored, but in
amounts of time that greatly exceed those of near
generations. Thus, these resources are considered
limited.

It is not intended that students memorize the processes
for the formation of all non-renewables, but rather to
understand that they are in some way connected to
geologic processes. A limited number of examples can be
used to establish this idea.

6.ESS3.2 Utilization of natural resources involves
weighing environmental, economic, and oftentimes
political conversations. Environmental discussions should
include models which help to predict effects and gains of
using a natural resource on the environment. Economic
considerations include the amount of energy which can
be harvested for the cost. For example, the economy of
installing residential photovoltaic systems depends on the
availability of sunlight in a person’s location or on their
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about the distribution of resources around earth IOT
explain the cause and effect relationship of geologic rate
and geologic processes.

6.ESS3.2
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about the pros and cons for specific renewable energy
sources IOT explain the benefits of renewable energy
sources and their impacts on the environment and
ecosystems.

SWBAT create an argument from evidence comparing
existing and developing technologies that will utilize
renewable and alternate energy sources IOT explain the
effects and gains of using a natural resource on the
environment.

6.ESS3.3
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about human activities IOT explain how humans
negatively and positively impact an area.

SWBAT construct an explanation describing the impacts
of human activities on the biosphere IOT explain the
cause and effect relationship of human activities in
relation to conservation, habitat management, species
endangerment, and extinction.

SWBAT plan and carryout an investigation to test
possible solutions IOT explain how to minimize human
impact on the wetland environment.

Managing Resources
• How Resourceful Are You? Activity, TE p. 302
• Active Reading #11, SE p. 278
• Visualize It! #12, SE p. 278
• Apply #13, SE p. 279
• Changing Habits Take It Home, TE p. 302
Advantages and Disadvantages of Managing Resources
• Active Reading #14, SE p. 280
• Visualize It! #15, SE p. 280
• Making Changes Discussion, TE p. 302
• Visualize It! #17, SE p. 281
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Magnet Word Graphic Organizer, TE p. 306
• Visual Summary, SE p. 282
Going Further
• Math Connection, TE p. 306
• Earth Science Connection, TE p. 306
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 307
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 283
Summative Assessment
• Managing Resources Alternative Assessment, TE
p. 307
• Lesson Quiz
• Unit 4 Big Idea, SE p. 286
• Unit 4 Review, SE pp. 287-290

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

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property. Political conversations are impacted by
considering global distributions of energy sources. As
technologies progress, energy harvesting becomes less
expensive and more efficient such that conversations
regarding the utilization of renewable and alternate
energy sources may shift over time.

6.ESS3.3 Beyond creating explanations for observations
of changes to the environment, this standard can also be
interpreted treated as a design task where students are
developing a device to monitor human impacts, similar to
6.ESS2.4. Part of the design process should involve
recognizing that many human activities are necessary but
analyzing the impacts of the activities can help to
development responsible constraints.

Human activities have greatly altered rates of change to
Earth’s surface. As humans develop land and build roads,
large amounts of natural habitat are lost, affecting the
species indigenous to that habitat. Students can obtain
and evaluate evidence that increases in human
populations or increases in the amount of energy
consumed per person also increase negative effects, but
engineered solutions can mitigate some of these negative
effects. For example, development of low energy
consumption lightbulbs (such as LED) can reduce the
amount of energy used in a home. Assessments of human
activities should include models which can assist in
making predictions for the efficacy of conservation efforts
with competing interests.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
6.ESS3.2
SWBAT design a solution or device to monitor human
impacts IOT analyze the impacts of the human activities
to develop responsible constraints.

Learning Outcomes
• Describe the impacts of resource extraction, use,
and disposal.
• Explain why resources need to be managed and the
role of stewardship and conservation.
• Describe the management practices for renewable
and nonrenewable resources.
• Explain the advantages and disadvantages of
managing resources.

Suggested Phenomenon

The Earth has many natural resources that can be
renewed in our lifetime, however, many cannot. Discuss
this idea with students, giving them time to generate and
record ideas.

The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds

https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
6.ESS3.1

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Energy ad Matter 6.ESS3.2
Cause and Effect 6.ESS3.1, 6.ESS3.3

Click on the picture to find out how a dairy farm is using
a methane digester to turn cow poop into electricity.
Students can complete a See Think Wonder Template
after watching the video.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

Shelby County Schools
2021-2022
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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s
Water

Unit 6
Human
Impact on
the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 5: Earth’s Water (1 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How and why is Earth constantly changing?
Unit 5, Lesson 1 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
The Water Cycle
0.5 weeks
(about 3 days)
How does water change state and move around on
Earth?
water cycle, sublimation, evaporation,
condensation, transpiration, precipitation
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS2: Earth Systems

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.4 Apply scientific principles to design a method to
analyze and interpret the impact of humans and other
organisms on the hydrologic cycle.

Explanation(s) and Support of Standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS2.4 In 4.ESS2.3, student consider the ways that living
organisms impact the land. This standard advances that
idea, noting that the increase in the number of organisms
present on the planet means that changes to the Earth
Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.4
SWBAT create a model of the hydrologic cycle IOT
display the components of the hydrologic cycle and how
it functions as a system.

SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about the negative impacts humans have on the
hydrologic cycle IOT explain the effects on drinkability,
rivers and lakes, aquifers, ground water, surface water,
reservoirs, oceans, water temperature, fresh water, and
water quality.

SWBAT develop and design a solution based on collected
data (i.e., measurements of precipitation and runoff) IOT
Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 6, Lesson 2 pp. 400-
413
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 361
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 361
Explore
• How Does Water Move Through the Water Cycle?
Virtual Lab, TE p. 403
Explain
Water Cycle and Change of State
• Visualize It! #5, SE p. 362
• Active Reading #6, SE p. 363
• Visualize It! #7, SE p. 363
Water in the Atmosphere
• Visualize It! #9, SE p. 364
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

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will occur at a faster rate. Some effects on the land are
inevitable as humans attempt to meet their needs,
however analysis of impacts can inform sustainable use
of resources. Impacts on the hydrologic cycle might
include impacts on runoff, use or contamination of
aquifers, etc.

Students designs might focus on how to minimize impacts
as a consequence of what their monitoring suggests,
however emphasis should be on types of data to be
collected and how students might collect data on factors
such as location, frequency, purpose for data, in order to
begin to define or resolve a design task.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Using Mathematical and Computational Thinking
6.ESS2.4

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Scale, Proportion, and Quantity 6.ESS2.4
explain how it will reduce human impact on water usage,
land usage, or pollution and create a stable area to live.

Learning Outcomes
• Describe the water cycle including how water
reaches the atmosphere and what happens after it
falls to Earth.

Suggested Phenomenon

The Earth has a certain amount of water that is
continuously moving over and under the Earth’s surface.
Humans affect the water cycle by polluting and taking
water out of the system.Students can complete a See
Think Wonder Template after examining the picture.

Possible Guiding Question(s):
Based on the picture, give specific examples of how
humans are affecting the water cycle?
How can this be prevented or minimized?

• Visualize It! #10, SE p. 365
• Summarize #11, SE p. 365
Water in the Oceans and on Land
• Active Reading #12, SE p. 366
• Visualize It! #13, SE p. 366
Transport of Matter and Energy
• Think Outside the Book #14, SE p. 367
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Water Moves Activity, TE p. 406
• Mind Map Graphic Organizer, TE p. 406
• Visual Summary, SE p. 370
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 407
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 371
Summative Assessment
• The Water Cycle Alternative Assessment, TE p.
407
• Lesson Quiz
• Altering the Water Cycle S.T.E.M., TE pp. 414-417

The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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2021-2022
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The Earth has a certain amount of water that is
continuously moving over and under the Earth’s surface.
Humans affect the water cycle by polluting and taking
water out of the system.Students can complete a See
Think Wonder Template after examining the picture.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

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2021-2022
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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s
Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on
the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 5: Earth’s Water (1 week)
Overarching Question(s)
How and why is Earth constantly changing? How do Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?
Unit 5, Lesson 2 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Surface Water and
Groundwater
0.5 weeks
(about 3 days)
How does fresh water flow on Earth?
surface water, channel, divide, groundwater,
tributary, aquifer, permeability, water table, watershed
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS2: Earth Systems
6.ESS3: Earth and Human Activity

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.4 Apply scientific principles to design a method to
analyze and interpret the impact of humans and other
organisms on the hydrologic cycle.

6.ESS3.3 Assess the impacts of human activities on the
biosphere including conservation, habitat management,
species endangerment, and extinction.

Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.4
SWBAT create a model of the hydrologic cycle IOT
display the components of the hydrologic cycle and
how it functions as a system.

SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about the negative impacts humans have on the
hydrologic cycle IOT explain the effects on drinkability,
rivers and lakes, aquifers, ground water, surface water,
reservoirs, oceans, water temperature, fresh water, and
water quality.

Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 6, Lesson 3 pp. 418-431
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 379
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 379
Explore
• Aquifers and Development Exploration Lab, TE p.
421
Explain
Surface Water
• Active Reading #6, SE p. 380
• Visualize It! #7, SE p. 381
Groundwater
• Visualize It! #12, SE p. 385
• Active Reading #14, SE p. 386
• Not a Drop to Drink Probing Questions, TE p. 420
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5

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Explanation(s) and Support of Standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS2.4 In 4.ESS2.3, students consider the ways that
living organisms impact the land. This standard advances
that idea, noting that the increase in the number of
organisms present on the planet means that changes to
the Earth will occur at a faster rate. Some effects on the
land are inevitable as humans attempt to meet their
needs, however analysis of impacts can inform
sustainable use of resources. Impacts on the hydrologic
cycle might include impacts on runoff, use or
contamination of aquifers, etc.

Students designs might focus on how to minimize
impacts as a consequence of what their monitoring
suggests, however emphasis should be on types of data
to be collected and how students might collect data on
factors such as location, frequency, purpose for data, in
order to begin to define or resolve a design task.

6.ESS3.3 Beyond creating explanations for observations
of changes to the environment, this standard can also be
interpreted treated as a design task where students are
developing a device to monitor human impacts, similar
to 6.ESS2.4. Part of the design process should involve
recognizing that many human activities are necessary,
but analyzing the impacts of the activities can help to
development responsible constraints.

Human activities have greatly altered rates of change to
Earth’s surface. As humans develop land and build roads,
large amounts of natural habitat are lost, affecting the
species indigenous to that habitat. Students can obtain
and evaluate evidence that increases in human
populations or increases in the amount of energy
SWBAT develop and design a solution based on
collected data (i.e., measurements of precipitation and
runoff) IOT explain how it will reduce human impact on
water usage, land usage, or pollution and create a
stable area to live.

6.ESS3.3
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about human activities IOT explain how humans
negatively and positively impact an area.

SWBAT construct an explanation describing the impacts
of human activities on the biosphere IOT explain the
cause and effect relationship of human activities in
relation to conservation, habitat management, species
endangerment, and extinction.

SWBAT plan and carryout an investigation to test
possible solutions IOT explain how to minimize human
impact on the wetland environment.

SWBAT design a solution or device to monitor human
impacts IOT analyze the impacts of the human activities
to develop responsible constraints.

Learning Outcomes
• Explain where surface water comes from and why
living things depend on it.
• Describe how humans use the water in
watersheds.
• Describe how groundwater forms and how it flows.
• Determine how aquifers are discharged and
recharged.

Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Cause and Effect Chain Graphic Organizer, TE p. 424
• Visual Summary, SE p. 388
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 425
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 389
Summative Assessment
• Surface Water and Groundwater Alternative
Assessment, TE p. 425
• Lesson Quiz

The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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consumed per person also increase negative effects, but
engineered solutions can mitigate some of these
negative effects. For example, development of low
energy consumption lightbulbs (such as LED) can reduce
the amount of energy used in a home. Assessments of
human activities should include models which can assist
in making predictions for the efficacy of conservation
efforts with competing interests.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Using Mathematical and Computational Thinking
6.ESS2.4
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
6.ESS3.3

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Scale, Proportion, and Quantity 6.ESS2.4
Cause and Effect 6.ESS3.3

Suggested Phenomenon

The Earth has a certain amount of water that is
continuously moving over and under the Earth’s
surface. Humans affect the water cycle by polluting and
taking water out of the system.Students can complete
a See Think Wonder Template after examining the
picture.

Possible Guiding Question(s):
Based on the picture, give specific examples of how
humans are affecting the water cycle?
How can this be prevented or minimized?

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

Shelby County Schools
2021-2022
23 of 46

The Earth has a certain amount of water that is
continuously moving over and under the Earth’s
surface. Humans affect the water cycle by polluting and
taking water out of the system.Students can complete
a See Think Wonder Template after examining the
picture.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

Shelby County Schools
2021-2022
24 of 46
6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on
the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 6: Human Impact on the Environment (2 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How and why is Earth constantly changing?
Unit 6, Lesson 1 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Human Impact on Water 1 week
What impact can human
activities have on water resources?
urbanization, water pollution, point-source pollution,
non-point source pollution, surface water,
groundwater, eutrophication
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS2: Earth Systems

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.4 Apply scientific principles to design a method to
analyze and interpret the impact of humans and other
organisms on the hydrologic cycle.

Explanation(s) and Support of Standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS2.4 In 4.ESS2.3, students consider the ways that
living organisms impact the land. This standard advances
that idea, noting that the increase in the number of
organisms present on the planet means that changes to
Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.4
SWBAT create a model of the hydrologic cycle IOT
display the components of the hydrologic cycle and how
it functions as a system.

SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about the negative impacts humans have on the
hydrologic cycle IOT explain the effects on drinkability,
rivers and lakes, aquifers, ground water, surface water,
reservoirs, oceans, water temperature, fresh water, and
water quality.

Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 5, Lesson 1 pp. 326-
341
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 295
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 295
Explore
• Ocean Pollution from Land Quick Lab, TE p. 329
Explain
Water as a Resource
• Active Reading #6, SE p. 297
Water Pollution
• Active Reading #8, SE p. 298
• Visualize It! #s 9-10, SE p. 299
Water Quality
• Predict #11, SE p. 300
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

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the Earth will occur at a faster rate. Some effects on the
land are inevitable as humans attempt to meet their
needs, however analysis of impacts can inform
sustainable use of resources. Impacts on the hydrologic
cycle might include impacts on runoff, use or
contamination of aquifers, etc.

Students designs might focus on how to minimize impacts
as a consequence of what their monitoring suggests,
however emphasis should be on types of data to be
collected and how students might collect data on factors
such as location, frequency, purpose for data, in order to
begin to define or resolve a design task.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Using Mathematical and Computational Thinking
6.ESS2.4

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Scale, Proportion, and Quantity 6.ESS2.4

SWBAT develop and design a solution based on collected
data (i.e., measurements of precipitation and runoff) IOT
explain how it will reduce human impact on water usage,
land usage, or pollution and create a stable area to live.

Learning Outcomes
• Explain why fresh water is a limited resource and the
importance of water quality.
• Describe the various ways in which water can be
polluted.
• Describe how urbanization can affect water quality.
• Explain how humans affect the fresh water flow and
supply.

Suggested Phenomena

The Earth has a certain amount of water that is
continuously moving over and under the Earth’s surface.
Humans affect the water cycle by polluting and taking
water out of the system.Students can complete a See
Think Wonder Template after examining the picture.

Possible Guiding Question(s):
Based on the picture, give specific examples of how
humans are affecting the water cycle?
How can this be prevented or minimized?
• Active Reading #13, SE p. 301
• Water in the Community Probing Question, TE p.
328
Water Supply and Flow
• Active Reading #14, SE p. 303
• Infer #15, SE p. 303
• Active Reading #17, SE p. 304
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Process Chart Graphic Organizer, TE p. 332
• Visual Summary, SE p. 306
Going Further
• Health Connection, TE p. 332
• Real World Connection, TE p. 332
• Why It Matters, SE p. 305
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 333
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 307
Summative Assessment
• Human Impact on Earth Alternative Assessment,
TE p. 333
• Lesson Quiz

The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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Statues made of organic rocks, like limestone or marble,
have changed over time. The change usually occurs over
decades and affects things only in locations exposed to
outside elements.Also, the problem is worsened in
highly populated urban areas where pollution may be an
issue.Students can complete a See Think Wonder
Template after examining the picture.

Possible Question(s):
What caused the statues appearance to change?

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://sites.google.com/site/sciencephenomena/

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The Earth has a certain amount of water that is
continuously moving over and under the Earth’s surface.
Humans affect the water cycle by polluting and taking
water out of the system.Students can complete a See
Think Wonder Template after examining the picture.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on
the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 6: Human Impact on the Environment (2 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How do the Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?
Unit 6, Lesson 2 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Human Impact on Land
0.5 weeks
(about 3 days)
What impact can human activities have on land
resources?
urbanization, urban sprawl, desertification,
land degradation, deforestation
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS3: Earth and Human Activity

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s)
are introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS3.3 Assess the impacts of human activities on the
biosphere including conservation, habitat management,
species endangerment, and extinction.

Explanation(s) and Support of Standard(s) from
TN Science Reference Guide
6.ESS3.3 Beyond creating explanations for observations
of changes to the environment, this standard can also
be interpreted treated as a design task where students
are developing a device to monitor human impacts,
Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS3.3
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about human activities IOT explain how humans
negatively and positively impact an area.

SWBAT construct an explanation describing the impacts
of human activities on the biosphere IOT explain the
cause and effect relationship of human activities in
relation to conservation, habitat management, species
endangerment, and extinction.

SWBAT plan and carryout an investigation to test
possible solutions IOT explain how to minimize human
impact on the wetland environment.
Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 5, Lesson 2 pp. 344-
357
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 313
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 313
• Is Soil a Renewable Resource? Probing Question, TE
p. 346
Explore
Land Degradation
• Investigating Human Impact on the Land Quick Lab,
TE p. 347
Explain
How Humans Use Land
• Visualize It! #5, SE p. 314
• Active Reading #6, SE p. 315
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

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similar to 6.ESS2.4. Part of the design process should
involve recognizing that many human activities are
necessary, but analyzing the impacts of the activities can
help to development responsible constraints.

Human activities have greatly altered rates of change to
Earth’s surface. As humans develop land and build
roads, large amounts of natural habitat are lost,
affecting the species indigenous to that habitat.
Students can obtain and evaluate evidence that
increases in human populations or increases in the
amount of energy consumed per person also increase
negative effects, but engineered solutions can mitigate
some of these negative effects. For example,
development of low energy consumption lightbulbs
(such as LED) can reduce the amount of energy used in a
home. Assessments of human activities should include
models which can assist in making predictions for the
efficacy of conservation efforts with competing
interests.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
6.ESS3.3

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Cause and Effect 6.ESS3.3
SWBAT design a solution or device to monitor human
impacts IOT analyze the impacts of the human activities
to develop responsible constraints.

Learning Outcomes
• Describe ways in which humans use land.
• Describe how human activities affect land and soil
leading to land degradation.

Suggested Phenomenon
Urbanization has replaced the forest area with a new
neighborhood to support a growing community.
Students can complete a See Think Wonder Template
after examining the picture.

Possible Guiding Question(s):
What happened to the plants and animals that once
lived in the area?
How is the land in the surrounding area affected by the
new neighborhood?
What can be done to minimize the impact?

• Active Reading #7, SE p. 315
• Active Reading #8, SE p. 316
• Visualize It! #9, SE p. 316
Land Degradation
• Think Outside the Book #13, SE p. 318
• Active Reading #14, SE p. 318
• Visualize It! #15, SE p. 319
• Land Degradation Posters Activity, TE p. 346
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• How Humans Use Land Graphic Organizer, TE p. 350
• Visual Summary, SE p. 320
Going Further
• Geography Connection, TE p. 350
• Social Studies Connection, TE p. 350
• Why It Matters, SE p. 317
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 351
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 321
Summative Assessment
• Human Impact on Land Alternative Assessment, TE
p. 351
• Lesson Quiz
The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on
the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 6: Human Impact on the Environment (2 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How and why is Earth constantly changing? How do Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?
Unit 6, Lesson 3 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Protecting Earth’s Water,
Land, and Air
0.5 weeks
(about 3 days)
How can Earth’s resources be used wisely?
conservation, stewardship, preservation,
reforestation, reclamation
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS2: Earth Systems
6.ESS3: Earth and Human Activity

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.4 Apply scientific principles to design a method to
analyze and interpret the impact of humans and other
organisms on the hydrologic cycle.

6.ESS3.3 Assess the impacts of human activities on the
biosphere including conservation, habitat management,
species endangerment, and extinction.

Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.4
SWBAT create a model of the hydrologic cycle IOT
display the components of the hydrologic cycle and how
it functions as a system.

SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about the negative impacts humans have on the
hydrologic cycle IOT explain the effects on drinkability,
rivers and lakes, aquifers, ground water, surface water,
reservoirs, oceans, water temperature, fresh water, and
water quality.

SWBAT develop and design a solution based on collected
data (i.e., measurements of precipitation and runoff) IOT
Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 5, Lesson 3 pp. 358-
373
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 325
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 325
• Conservation at School Activity, TE p. 360
• Packaging Daily Demo, TE p. 361
Explore
Conservation and Stewardship
• Investigate the Value of Recycling Quick Lab, TE p.
361
Preservation and Conservation of Water
• Filtering Water Exploration Lab, TE p. 361
Land Management and Conservation
• Soil Erosion Quick Lab, SE p. 361

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5

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Explanation(s) and Support of Standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS2.4 In 4.ESS2.3, students consider the ways that
living organisms impact the land. This standard advances
that idea, noting that the increase in the number of
organisms present on the planet means that changes to
the Earth will occur at a faster rate. Some effects on the
land are inevitable as humans attempt to meet their
needs, however analysis of impacts can inform
sustainable use of resources. Impacts on the hydrologic
cycle might include impacts on runoff, use or
contamination of aquifers, etc.

Students designs might focus on how to minimize impacts
as a consequence of what their monitoring suggests,
however emphasis should be on types of data to be
collected and how students might collect data on factors
such as location, frequency, purpose for data, in order to
begin to define or resolve a design task.

6.ESS3.3 Beyond creating explanations for observations
of changes to the environment, this standard can also be
interpreted treated as a design task where students are
developing a device to monitor human impacts, similar to
6.ESS2.4. Part of the design process should involve
recognizing that many human activities are necessary but
analyzing the impacts of the activities can help to
development responsible constraints.

Human activities have greatly altered rates of change to
Earth’s surface. As humans develop land and build roads,
large amounts of natural habitat are lost, affecting the
species indigenous to that habitat. Students can obtain
and evaluate evidence that increases in human
populations or increases in the amount of energy
explain how it will reduce human impact on water usage,
land usage, or pollution and create a stable area to live.

6.ESS3.3
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about human activities IOT explain how humans
negatively and positively impact an area.

SWBAT construct an explanation describing the impacts
of human activities on the biosphere IOT explain the
cause and effect relationship of human activities in
relation to conservation, habitat management, species
endangerment, and extinction.

SWBAT plan and carryout an investigation to test
possible solutions IOT explain how to minimize human
impact on the wetland environment.

SWBAT design a solution or device to monitor human
impacts IOT analyze the impacts of the human activities
to develop responsible constraints.

Learning Outcomes
• Describe conservation and explain the importance of
wise stewardship of Earth’s resources.
• Explain the importance of maintaining water quality
and sustainable water use.
• Describe ways to prevent water pollution.
• Describe benefits of sustainable land management
and conservation.
• Describe ways to prevent or repair land degradation.
• Explain four ways people are working to reduce air
pollution.

Explain
Conservation and Stewardship
• Visualize It! #6, SE p. 326
• Compare #7, SE p. 327
• Visualize It! #8, SE p. 327
Preservation and Conservation of Water
• Identify #10, SE p. 328
• Visualize It! #11, SE p. 329
Land Management and Conservation
• Active Reading #12, SE p. 330
• Think Outside the Book #13, SE p. 330
• Visualize It! #14, SE p. 331
• Apply #15, SE p. 332
• Active Reading #16, SE p. 333
• Human Impact Virtual Lab, TE p. 359
Reducing Air Pollution
• Active Reading #19, SE p. 334
• Visualize It! #20, SE p. 335
• Summarize #21, SE p. 335
• The Cost of Energy Discussion, TE p. 360
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Venn Diagram Graphic Organizer, TE p. 364
• Visual Summary, SE p. 336
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 365
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 337
Summative Assessment
• Protecting Earth’s Water, Land, and Air
Alternative Assessment, TE p. 365
• Lesson Quiz
• Unit 5 Big Idea, SE p. 340
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

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consumed per person also increase negative effects, but
engineered solutions can mitigate some of these negative
effects. For example, development of low energy
consumption lightbulbs (such as LED) can reduce the
amount of energy used in a home. Assessments of human
activities should include models which can assist in
making predictions for the efficacy of conservation efforts
with competing interests.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Using Mathematical and Computational Thinking
6.ESS2.4
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
6.ESS3.3

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Scale, Proportion, and Quantity 6.ESS2.4
Cause and Effect 6.ESS3.3

Suggested Phenomenon

Water conservation begins with you!Students can
complete a See Think Wonder Template after examining
the picture.

Possible Guiding Question(s):
What can you do to help conserve water?
What can you do to lessen the impact of our activities on
the biosphere?

• Unit 5 Review, SE pp. 341-344

The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s
Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on
the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 7: Earth’s Systems (3 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How and why is Earth constantly changing?
Unit 7, Lesson 1 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Energy Transfer 1 week How does energy move through Earth’s system?
temperature, heat, conduction, thermal energy,
radiation, atmosphere, thermal expansion, convection
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS2: Earth Systems

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.1 Gather evidence to justify that oceanic
convection currents are caused by the sun’s transfer of
heat energy and differences in salt concentration leading
to global water movement.

6.ESS2.2 Diagram convection patterns that flow due to
uneven heating of the earth.

*6.PS3.4 Conduct an investigation to demonstrate the
way heat (thermal energy) moves among objects through
radiation, conduction, or convection.*
Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.1
SWBAT obtain and communicate information about
ocean currents, temperature, and density IOT describe
the cause and effect relationship between ocean
currents, temperature, and density.

SWBAT create a model of oceanic convection currents
IOT demonstrate how they originate and the patterns
they form.

SWBAT engage in an argument from evidence to justify
that ocean currents are caused by the sun’s heat and
salinity IOT demonstrate changes in water movement
when temperature and salinity changes.
Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 7, Lesson 1 pp. 444-
458
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 401
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 401
• Transfer Energy Daily Demo, TE p. 447
• Modeling Convection Quick Lab, TE p. 447
Explore
Radiation
• Heat from the Sun S.T.E.M. Lab, TE p. 446
• The Sun’s Angle and Temperature Quick Lab, TE p.
447
Explain
Temperature, Heat, Thermal Energy, Thermal
Expansion
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5

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Explanation(s) and Support of Standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS2.1 Students should be able to use evidence to
create models for how oceanic convection currents
originate. Such a model should include not only the sun’s
warming of equatorial waters, but also the impact ice at
the poles causing water to descend.

The primary factors influencing ocean currents are
unequal heating of the earth’s surface, differences in
energy transfer to land vs ocean, and density-related
behaviors of heated or cooled water. Demonstrations of
the temperature-based behavior can be performed by
heating one side of a water-filled baking dish and cooling
the opposite side. If the water is initially allowed to settle,
drops of food coloring will trace out the convection
patterns which develop. Pipets can be used to insert the
food coloring into the lower currents. Demonstration of
the effect of salt on creating a sinking mass of water can
be accomplished by partially filling a large container with
water then covering the surface of the water with plastic
wrap and pouring an additional volume of salt containing,
colored water onto the wrap. With the gentle removal of
the plastic wrap, the mixing will be visible. Reversing the
order that the waters are added will provide the opposite
effect.

(From third grade, students will have developed
understandings of mass and volume; however, the topic
of density will need to be explored to fully support
6.ESS2.1 and 6.ESS2.2. Calculations of density are beyond
the scope of this standard.)

6.ESS2.2 Models for which demonstrate convection
patterns should incorporate the Sun, Earth (rotating),
SWBAT plan an investigation to explore water
movement IOT demonstrate how temperature effects
water movement.

SWBAT construct an explanation describing the water
movement investigation IOT explain the patterns that
occur between the sun’s heating and the movement of
ocean water.

SWBAT develop and communicate a scientific
explanation of global water movement IOT describe how
density and temperature are the major drivers of global
water movement.

6.ESS2.2
SWBAT construct an explanation about convection
patterns IOT describe how convection currents cause
wind formation.

SWBAT create a model of the sun’s uneven heating IOT
illustrate how the sun’s uneven heating causes
convection cells in Earth’s atmosphere and creates global
winds.

SWBAT model how wind forms, sources of energy that
cause atmospheric movement, why air moves, how
convection cells affect wind, and the Coriolis Effect IOT
construct explanations and create illustrations of
convection patterns.

SWBAT develop models to show convection patterns and
how they flow due to uneven heating from the sun IOT
demonstrate that heat energy drives the movement of
matter in a system.

• Visualize It! #5, SE p. 402
• Predict #6, SE p. 403
• Inquiry #7, SE p. 403
• Active Reading #8, SE p. 404
• Visualize It! #9, SE p. 404
• Predict #10, SE p. 405
Radiation
• Visualize It! #11, SE p. 406
• Summarize #12, SE p. 407
Convection
• Visualize It! #14, SE p. 408
• Active Reading #15, SE p. 409
• Visualize It! #16, SE p. 409
Conduction
• Active Reading #17, SE p. 410
• Visualize It! #18, SE p. 410
• Summarize #19, SE p. 411
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Energy Transfer Game, TE p. 450
• Pyramid Fold Note Graphic Organizer, TE p. 450
• Visual Summary, SE p. 412
Going Further
• Real World Connection, TE p. 450
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 451
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 413
Summative Assessment
• Transfer of Energy Alternative Assessment, TE p.
451
• Lesson Quiz
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

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ocean, and land. The relationships between these
components also make it possible to explain patterns in
the distribution of climate types and resulting biomes
(6.LS2.4).

A model for heating of the Earth shows more direct
heating of the earth’s equator relative to the poles
creating two large convection cells which move ascend at
the equator and descend at the poles north and south
poles. The Coriolis force, due to the Earth’s spin breaks
the two convection cells into a total of six cells, three in
the southern hemisphere and three in the norther
hemisphere.

This breakup (Coriolis effect) can be modeled by a pair of
students using a marker and a large sphere. If the sphere
is stationary, a student can use a marker to draw a
straight line from the equator to the poles. If the ball is
rotated while drawing this same straight line, the
resulting line drawn on the sphere will curve. Rate of
rotation determines the severity of the curvature, Earth’s
rate of spin results in three cells, with deserts focused at
latitudes near 30 degrees and 60 degrees north and
south, and predictable surface winds. (Memorization of
the names of specific global winds and layers of the
atmosphere are beyond the scope of this standard.)

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Engaging in Argument from Evidence 6.ESS2.1
Developing and Using Models 6.ESS2.2

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Cause and Effect 6.ESS2.1
Systems and System Models 6.ESS2.2
Learning Outcomes
• Describe what happens when objects at different
temperatures come into contact.
• Summarize the process of radiation and identify
examples of radiation on Earth.
• Describe the sun as the main source of energy on
Earth’s surface.
• Summarize the process of convection and identify
examples of convection on Earth.
• Summarize conduction and identify examples of
conduction on Earth.

Suggested Phenomenon
Possible Guiding Question(s):
How is energy being transferred?

The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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The Earth is not heated evenly.Students can complete a
See Think Wonder Template after examining the picture.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s
Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on
the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 7: Earth’s Systems (3 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How and why is Earth constantly changing?
Unit 7, Lesson 2 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Wind in the Atmosphere 1 week What is wind?
wind, jet stream, Coriolis effect,
local wind, global wind
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS2: Earth Systems

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.2 Diagram convection patterns that flow due to
uneven heating of the earth.

6.ESS2.3 Construct explanation for how atmospheric
flow, geographic features, and ocean currents affect the
climate of a region through heat transfer.

Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.2
SWBAT construct an explanation about convection
patterns IOT describe how convection currents cause
wind formation.

SWBAT create a model of the sun’s uneven heating IOT
illustrate how the sun’s uneven heating causes
convection cells in Earth’s atmosphere and creates global
winds.

Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 7, Lesson 2 pp. 464-
477
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 421
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 421
Explore
The Movement of Air
• Rising Heat Quick Lab, TE p. 467
Explain
The Movement of Air
• Visualize It! #5, SE p. 422
• Active Reading #6, SE p. 423
• Visualize It! #7, SE p. 423
• Modeling Air Movement by Convection Quick Lab,
TE p. 467
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5

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Explanation(s) and Support of Standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS2.2 Models for which demonstrate convection
patterns should incorporate the Sun, Earth (rotating),
ocean, and land. The relationships between these
components also make it possible to explain patterns in
the distribution of climate types and resulting biomes
(6.LS2.4).

A model for heating of the Earth shows more direct
heating of the earth’s equator relative to the poles
creating two large convection cells which move ascend at
the equator and descend at the poles north and south
poles. The Coriolis force, due to the Earth’s spin breaks
the two convection cells into a total of six cells, three in
the southern hemisphere and three in the norther
hemisphere.

This breakup (Coriolis effect) can be modeled by a pair of
students using a marker and a large sphere. If the sphere
is stationary, a student can use a marker to draw a
straight line from the equator to the poles. If the ball is
rotated while drawing this same straight line, the
resulting line drawn on the sphere will curve. Rate of
rotation determines the severity of the curvature, Earth’s
rate of spin results in three cells, with deserts focused at
latitudes near 30 degrees and 60 degrees north and
south, and predictable surface winds.
(Memorization of the names of specific global winds and
layers of the atmosphere are beyond the scope of this
standard.)

6.ESS2.3 A number of interacting parts contribute to the
distribution of similar climates across the globe. Such
components include factors addressed in 6.ESS2.2, as
SWBAT model how wind forms, sources of energy that
cause atmospheric movement, why air moves, how
convection cells affect wind, and the Coriolis Effect IOT
construct explanations and create illustrations of
convection patterns.

SWBAT develop models to show convection patterns and
how they flow due to uneven heating from the sun IOT
demonstrate that heat energy drives the movement of
matter in a system.

6.ESS2.3
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about climate variations IOT explain how mountain
ranges, bodies of water, and other geographic features
cause climate variations.

SWBAT create an explanation about weather and climate
IOT describe how wind, surface ocean currents, and
deep ocean currents affect weather and climate along
coastal regions.

SWBAT compare models of global winds and surface
oceans currents IOT identify both common and unique
model components, relationships, and mechanisms.

SWBAT construct an explanation about global winds and
surface ocean currents IOT compare the heat flow
causing each.

Global Winds
• Active Reading #8, SE p. 424
• Active Reading #11, SE p. 426
• Jet Streams and Weather Discussion, TE p. 466
• Journey of a Trade Wind Activity, TE p. 466
Local Winds
• Active Reading #16, SE p. 428
• Visualize It! #17, SE p. 428
• Visualize It! #18, SE p. 429
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Cluster Diagram Graphic Organizer, TE p. 470
• Visual Summary, SE p. 430
Going Further
• Astronomy Connection, TE p. 470
• Environmental Science Connection, TE 470
• Why It Matters, TE p. 471
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 471
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 431
Summative Assessment
• Wind in the Atmosphere Alternative Assessment,
TE p. 471
• Lesson Quiz
The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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well as the ocean, land masses, different land surfaces,
and impacts of living organisms. Student explanations can
include the impact of solar energy on relative changes in
temperature occurring in land/ocean (e.g., land warms
more quickly), high altitudes/low altitudes (e.g., high
altitudes have lower temperatures), and earth surfaces
(e.g., ice reflects sunlight). Living things alter the surface
types in an area, thus impacting energy transfer to
affected areas. On land, surface features such as
mountains can direct the flow of air masses upwards,
inducing temperature related effects such as rain.
While the Coriolis effect creates general patterns for
distribution of similar climates, it is possible for the
climate in a region to vary from the climate seen at
similar latitudes due to the presence of geographic
features such as mountains or lakes. Coastal air rising
over mountains will be depleted of its moisture and
create deserts on the back side of the mountain.
Likewise, large bodies of water can influence the
temperature and humidity of a region due to the ability
of water to store large amounts of thermal energy.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Developing and Using Models 6.ESS2.2
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
6.ESS2.3

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Systems and System Models 6.ESS2.2, 6.ESS2.3

Learning Outcomes
• Explain why air moves and identify the source of
energy that causes air movement.
• Describe how convection cells in Earth’s atmosphere
cause high- and low pressure belts at Earth’s
surface.
• Summarize the Coriolis effect.
• Describe two factors that produce global winds.
• Explain differences in the way land and water absorb
and release energy cause local winds, such as sea,
land, valley, and mountain breezes.

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Suggested Phenomenon

In the absence of the Coriolis effect in the fixed model of
the Earth, you can see the cold air from the poles and
the warm air from the equator create 4 distinct
convection cells. Since Earth rotates on its axis these
large cells do not actually form. Descending air is
deflected on the right breaking the large convection
current into 3 distinct cells. The wind cells are created as
alternating high and lows.Students can complete a See
Think Wonder Template after examining the picture.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

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6th Grade Science Quarter 3 Curriculum Map
Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
Unit 1
Energy
Unit 2
Relationships Among
Organisms
Unit 3
Earth’s Biomes and
Ecosystems
Unit 4
Earth’s
Resources
Unit 5
Earth’s
Water
Unit 6
Human
Impact on
the
Environment
Unit 7
Earth’s
Systems
Unit 8
Weather and
Climate
5 weeks 6.5 weeks 5.5 weeks 3 weeks 1 week 2 weeks 3 weeks 9 weeks
UNIT 7: Earth’s Systems (3 weeks)
Overarching Question(s)
How and why is Earth constantly changing?
Unit 7, Lesson 3 Lesson Length Essential Question Vocabulary 30-30-30
Ocean Currents 1 week How does water move in the ocean?
ocean current, deep current, surface current,
convection current, Coriolis effect, upwelling
Standards and Related Background Information Instructional Focus Instructional Resources
DCI(s)
6.ESS2: Earth Systems

Standard(s) *All or a portion of the following standard(s) are
introduced and/or addressed in this lesson and may be
addressed again in future lessons.*
6.ESS2.1 Gather evidence to justify that oceanic
convection currents are caused by the sun’s transfer of
heat energy and differences in salt concentration leading
to global water movement.

6.ESS2.2 Diagram convection patterns that flow due to
uneven heating of the earth.

6.ESS2.3 Construct explanation for how atmospheric
flow, geographic features, and ocean currents affect the
climate of a region through heat transfer.
Performance-Based Objectives *All or a portion of the
following PBO(s) are supported in this lesson and may be
referenced again in future lessons.*

6.ESS2.1
SWBAT obtain and communicate information about
ocean currents, temperature, and density IOT describe
the cause and effect relationship between ocean
currents, temperature, and density.

SWBAT create a model of oceanic convection currents
IOT demonstrate how they originate and the patterns
they form.

Curricular Materials
HMH Tennessee Science TE, Unit 7, Lesson 3 pp.478-
492
Engage
• Engage Your Brain #s 1 and 2, SE p. 435
• Active Reading #s 3 and 4, SE p. 435
Explore
Surface Currents in the Ocean
• Can Messages Travel on Ocean Water? Quick Lab,
TE p. 481
• Modeling the Coriolis Effect Quick Lab, TE p. 481
• Ocean Currents Virtual Lab, TE p. 481
Explain
Surface Currents in the Ocean
• Visualize #6, SE p. 436
• Identify #7, SE p. 437
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Xw4e3LGy-HdQGZoUNCUgWmfV5hkupSEW/view?usp=sharing
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:b:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/EfzzlUfDVBFCh8fHwNJuMVYBA8ZW_rwxlv5QO1t6psz-Eg?e=1vQrn5

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Explanation(s) and Support of Standard(s) from TN
Science Reference Guide
6.ESS2.1 Students should be able to use evidence to
create models for how oceanic convection currents
originate. Such a model should include not only the sun’s
warming of equatorial waters, but also the impact ice at
the poles causing water to descend.

The primary factors influencing ocean currents are
unequal heating of the earth’s surface, differences in
energy transfer to land vs ocean, and density-related
behaviors of heated or cooled water. Demonstrations of
the temperature-based behavior can be performed by
heating one side of a water-filled baking dish and cooling
the opposite side. If the water is initially allowed to settle,
drops of food coloring will trace out the convection
patterns which develop. Pipets can be used to insert the
food coloring into the lower currents. Demonstration of
the effect of salt on creating a sinking mass of water can
be accomplished by partially filling a large container with
water then covering the surface of the water with plastic
wrap and pouring an additional volume of salt containing,
colored water onto the wrap. With the gentle removal of
the plastic wrap, the mixing will be visible. Reversing the
order that the waters are added will provide the opposite
effect.

(From third grade, students will have developed
understandings of mass and volume; however, the topic
of density will need to be explored to fully support
6.ESS2.1 and 6.ESS2.2. Calculations of density are beyond
the scope of this standard.)

SWBAT engage in an argument from evidence to justify
that ocean currents are caused by the sun’s heat and
salinity IOT demonstrate changes in water movement
when temperature and salinity changes.

SWBAT plan an investigation to explore water
movement IOT demonstrate how temperature effects
water movement.

SWBAT construct an explanation describing the water
movement investigation IOT explain the patterns that
occur between the sun’s heating and the movement of
ocean water.

SWBAT develop and communicate a scientific
explanation of global water movement IOT describe how
density and temperature are the major drivers of global
water movement.

6.ESS2.2
SWBAT construct an explanation about convection
patterns IOT describe how convection currents cause
wind formation.

SWBAT create a model of the sun’s uneven heating IOT
illustrate how the sun’s uneven heating causes
convection cells in Earth’s atmosphere and creates global
winds.

SWBAT model how wind forms, sources of energy that
cause atmospheric movement, why air moves, how
convection cells affect wind, and the Coriolis Effect IOT
construct explanations and create illustrations of
convection patterns.

• Analyze #8, SE p. 438
• Visualize It! #9, SE p. 439
Deep Currents in the Ocean
• Active Reading #10, SE p.
• Visualize It! #11, SE p. 440
• Think Outside the Book #12, SE p. 441
• Inquiry #13, SE p. 441
• Salty Seawater Discussion, TE p. 480
• The Formation of Deep Currents Quick Lab, TE p.
481
Upwelling
• Active Reading #14, SE p. 442
Ocean Circulation
• Active Reading #19, SE p. 444
• Describe #20, SE p. 444
• List #21, SE p. 445
Extend
Reinforce and Review
• Idea Wheel Activity, TE p. 484
• Two-Panel Flipchart Fold Note, TE p. 484
• Visual Summary, SE p. 446
Going Further
• Ecology Connection, TE p. 484
• Health Connection, TE p. 484
• Why It Matters, SE p. 443
Evaluate
Formative Assessment
• Reteach, TE p. 485
• Throughout TE
• Lesson Review, SE p. 447
Summative Assessment
• Ocean Currents Alternative Assessment, TE p. 485
• Lesson Quiz
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1SkukWfS6NHf8YaE65aXqZw65gBfg4vHW?usp=sharing

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6.ESS2.2 Models for which demonstrate convection
patterns should incorporate the Sun, Earth (rotating),
ocean, and land. The relationships between these
components also make it possible to explain patterns in
the distribution of climate types and resulting biomes
(6.LS2.4).

A model for heating of the Earth shows more direct
heating of the earth’s equator relative to the poles
creating two large convection cells which move ascend at
the equator and descend at the poles north and south
poles. The Coriolis force, due to the Earth’s spin breaks
the two convection cells into a total of six cells, three in
the southern hemisphere and three in the norther
hemisphere.

This breakup (Coriolis effect) can be modeled by a pair of
students using a marker and a large sphere. If the sphere
is stationary, a student can use a marker to draw a
straight line from the equator to the poles. If the ball is
rotated while drawing this same straight line, the
resulting line drawn on the sphere will curve. Rate of
rotation determines the severity of the curvature, Earth’s
rate of spin results in three cells, with deserts focused at
latitudes near 30 degrees and 60 degrees north and
south, and predictable surface winds.

(Memorization of the names of specific global winds and
layers of the atmosphere are beyond the scope of this
standard.)

6.ESS2.3 A number of interacting parts contribute to the
distribution of similar climates across the globe. Such
components include factors addressed in 6.ESS2.2, as
well as the ocean, land masses, different land surfaces,
SWBAT develop models to show convection patterns and
how they flow due to uneven heating from the sun IOT
demonstrate that heat energy drives the movement of
matter in a system.

6.ESS2.3
SWBAT obtain, evaluate, and communicate information
about climate variations IOT explain how mountain
ranges, bodies of water, and other geographic features
cause climate variations.

SWBAT create an explanation about weather and climate
IOT describe how wind, surface ocean currents, and
deep ocean currents affect weather and climate along
coastal regions.

SWBAT compare models of global winds and surface
oceans currents IOT identify both common and unique
model components, relationships, and mechanisms.

SWBAT construct an explanation about global winds and
surface ocean currents IOT compare the heat flow
causing each.

Learning Outcomes
• Define ocean currents and surface currents.
• Define deep currents and explain how they form.
• Describe convection current and explain how they
transfer energy.
• Define upwelling and explain its importance to
ocean life.
• Describe ocean circulation.

The following resources can be accessed by
clicking on the hyperlinks below:

Additional Resources

ESL Supports and Scaffolds
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/ERht1EIuD71HlMUFeYURm8MBj4PCRmN6ZfXaZSh6C3qftQ?e=iPpoXS
https://scsk12-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/g/personal/jacksonkd_scsk12_org/Ed7Xj0RX5otEmwHiHqcHN2cBgtMRALLCagNrwtlJPorwsg?e=c1RNNe

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and impacts of living organisms. Student explanations can
include the impact of solar energy on relative changes in
temperature occurring in land/ocean (e.g., land warms
more quickly), high altitudes/low altitudes (e.g., high
altitudes have lower temperatures), and earth surfaces
(e.g., ice reflects sunlight). Living things alter the surface
types in an area, thus impacting energy transfer to
affected areas. On land, surface features such as
mountains can direct the flow of air masses upwards,
inducing temperature related effects such as rain.

While the Coriolis effect creates general patterns for
distribution of similar climates, it is possible for the
climate in a region to vary from the climate seen at
similar latitudes due to the presence of geographic
features such as mountains or lakes. Coastal air rising
over mountains will be depleted of its moisture and
create deserts on the back side of the mountain.
Likewise, large bodies of water can influence the
temperature and humidity of a region due to the ability
of water to store large amounts of thermal energy.

Suggested Science and Engineering Practice(s)
Engaging in Argument From Evidence 6.ESS2.1
Developing and Using Models 6.ESS2.2
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
6.ESS2.3

Suggested Crosscutting Concept(s)
Cause and Effect 6.ESS2.1
Systems and System Models 6.ESS2.2, 6.ESS2.3

Suggested Phenomenon

One special property of water is that it is able to absorb
large amounts of heat. Because the oceans make up 70%
of Earth, there is a lot of heat in the oceans (even though
they feel cool). Ocean waters closer to the equator
receive more of the Sun’s heat than ocean waters near
the poles. Like the atmosphere, this temperature
difference creates convection currents in the ocean.
Warmer water rises up, and cooler water flows in to take
its place, creating ocean currents.Students can
complete a See Think Wonder Template after examining
the picture.

Possible Guiding Question(s):
What is causes the arrows to move in a circular pattern?
Why are some arrows red and others are blue?

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ

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A ship travelling from Hong Kong encountered a severe
storm, causing its cargo of over 28,000 rubber ducks to
be lost at sea. Rubber ducks were discovered several
months later in Alaska. Over the years, rubber ducks
were found all over the world.Students can complete a
See Think Wonder Template after examining the picture
and reading the above statement. This Ducks overboard!
video and What Can 28,000 Rubber Duckies Lost at Sea
Teach Us About Our Oceans article can be used later in
the lesson to support the phenomenon.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ


https://www.treehugger.com/what-can-rubber-duckies-lost-at-sea-teach-us-about-4864165
https://www.treehugger.com/what-can-rubber-duckies-lost-at-sea-teach-us-about-4864165

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The Eastern Australia Current (EAC) plays a critical role in
transporting turtles between habitats across the
southern Pacific Ocean. Click on the picture to see this
phenomenon in action in Finding Nemo. Students can
complete a See Think Wonder Template after watching.
the video. Takin’ a Ride on the EAC… across the Southern
Pacific Ocean article can be used later in the lesson to
support the phenomenon.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_mQCG3vtHU13YJsSl0NzYH2mF_3DgcrQ
https://www.seaturtlestatus.org/articles/2010/takin-a-ride-on-the-eac-across-the-southern-pacific-ocean
https://www.seaturtlestatus.org/articles/2010/takin-a-ride-on-the-eac-across-the-southern-pacific-ocean

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