Posted: August 4th, 2022

BUS4101 Week 5 Project

I’m working on a question and I need some help.

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BUS4101 Quality Management

© 2013 South University

Quality Culture and Management

The following are some guidelines that would help the management understand its role in
forming, maintaining, and improving a quality culture:

• Understand

It is imperative for the management to understand how the culture of an organization
affects the quality of its products and services and how a quality culture may incorporate
social responsibility as well as ethical behavior. This understanding helps devise
appropriate ways of regulating the quality of cultural areas such as communication,
interpersonal relations, methods of handling conflict, problem solving, and customer
focus.

• Demonstrate

A manager needs to demonstrate organizational values such as trust, integrity, and
responsibility in every action, intention, and word. This demonstration helps other
employees understand and emulate ethical behavior, make ethical decisions, and realize
the importance of ethical behavior when working with customers or providing services for
the organization.

• Create and Implement

The manager’s role in creating a quality culture begins by establishing policies and
procedures to promote and maintain a quality culture. These policies and procedures
establish a direction, not only for employees, but also for the organization. Similarly,
managers need to create and implement a code of conduct for the organization. This
code should be part of employee orientation training, so every employee understands the
expectations of the organization.

Page1 of 1

BUS4101 Quality Management

© 2013 South University

Elements of Quality Culture

You may use the following elements to evaluate whether or not an organization nourishes a
quality culture:

• Business Environment

Is the environment of the organization oriented to change and quality improvement? For
example, an organization having a quality culture will have a business environment that
naturally emphasizes continuous improvement of processes, has a healthy workplace,
focuses on customer satisfaction, and aims at growing as a profitable company.

• Organizational Values

Does the organization have quality-oriented values, ethics, and responsibilities? For
example, all employees of an organization having a quality culture will demonstrate an
understanding of the organization’s quality goals and values and work together to
achieve them. Their attitude and behavior will be attuned to the fact that what is good for
the customers is good for the organization and its employees.

• Cultural Role Models

Does the organization have cultural role models who uphold the organizational values?
For example, in an organization having a quality culture, the managers and leaders would
be committed to the quality standards. The employees of the organization may look up to
these managers and leaders, find the right direction toward quality, and get motivated to
participate in the organization’s quality drive.

• Organizational Customs

Is the organizational custom, including factors such as a dress code, employee
interactions, and peer relations, conducive to quality improvement? For example, an
important part of quality culture is to have well-groomed and well-behaved employees
and a professional ambience.

• Cultural Transmitters

Does the organization have the right people and mechanism to transmit the
organizational culture from one generation of employees to another? For example, an
organization having a quality culture would make sure it has appropriate and documented
standards and guidelines that lead to continual development of quality. In addition, it must
also have a system that trains and creates people who act as cultural transmitters.

Building A Quality Culture

Quality Culture and Management

The management of an organization holds the greatest responsibility in forming, maintaining, and

improving a quality culture.  The following are some tasks that management should perform in order to

ful�ll its role in forming, maintaining, and improving a quality culture:

Understand

It is imperative for the management to understand how the culture of an organization affects the

quality of its products and services, and how a quality culture may incorporate social

responsibility as well as ethical behavior. This understanding helps devise appropriate ways of

regulating the quality of cultural areas such as communication, interpersonal relations, methods

of handling con�ict, problem solving, and customer focus.

Demonstrate

A manager needs to demonstrate organizational values such as trust, integrity, and responsibility

in every action, intention, and word. This demonstration helps other employees understand and

emulate ethical behavior, make ethical decisions, and realize the importance of ethical behavior

when working with customers or providing services for the organization.

Create and Implement

The manager’s role in creating a quality culture begins by establishing policies and procedures to

promote and maintain a quality culture. These policies and procedures establish a direction, not
only for employees, but also for the organization. Similarly, managers need to create and

implement a code of conduct for the organization. This code should be part of employee

orientation training, so every employee understands the expectations of the organization.

As a quality management professional, you might have the capability to devise effective quality

strategies, �nd ways of smoothly executing them, and know how to form the most appropriate

partnerships and alliances. However, in real life, you will �nd all these and more are possible only in an
organization that nurtures a culture of quality.  See the Supplemental Media entitled “Quality Culture

Dimensions” in order to review some of the things that management will need to oversee as it attempt

to establish or strengthen a quality culture. 

Additional Materials

Quality Culture Dimensions 

(media/week2/SUO_BUS4101%20W2%20L3%20Qualty%20Culture%20Dimensions ?

_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832)

View a PDF transcript of Quality Culture And Management
(media/transcripts/SU_BUS4101_W2_L4_G1 ?

_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832)

View a PDF transcript of Elements of Quality Culture

(media/transcripts/SU_BUS4101_W2_L4_G2 ?

_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832)


https://myclasses.southuniversity.edu/content/enforced/90832-17106883/media/week2/SUO_BUS4101%20W2%20L3%20Qualty%20Culture%20Dimensions ?_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832

https://myclasses.southuniversity.edu/content/enforced/90832-17106883/media/transcripts/SU_BUS4101_W2_L4_G1 ?_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832

https://myclasses.southuniversity.edu/content/enforced/90832-17106883/media/transcripts/SU_BUS4101_W2_L4_G2 ?_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832

Leadership Styles
Will They Follow?

There are different types of leadership styles, and each style has specific advantages or disadvantages.

Autocratic

The autocratic leadership style may be considered a dictatorial type of leadership. Autocratic leaders tell the
employees exactly what to do. Therefore, employees often are not involved in the decision-making process,
and are, therefore, less likely to accept the directions that they receive.

Democratic

The democratic leadership style encourages gathering employee feedback and, as a result, involves the
employees in the decision-making process. The leaders make the final decision after soliciting
recommendations from members within a group responsible for a specific product or a service. The
democratic leaders may make compromises, and, then, they may make the right decision, which may not
always be the most popular.

Participative

The participative leadership style is also known as an open, or nondirect, form of leadership style. Leaders
who adopt this style establish little control over the decision-making processes. They may allow the team or
group to develop solutions to problems, take the information, and then provide a consensus of all inputs.

Goal-Oriented

The goal-oriented leadership style is based on achieving objectives and looking at the final results. The
goal-oriented leaders may only look at goals and establish a strategy for achieving the goals. This style may
minimize creativity and critical thinking.

Situational

The situational leadership style is considered a form of contingency-based leadership style. Situational
leaders make decisions based on specific situations or instances occurring at a specific time. They may not
take into account specific goals or objectives that lead to the vision or mission of the organization.

© 2017 South University

Leadership and Change

The management, as well as the organizational leaders, plays an important role in implementing

organizational changes. Often, managers are equated with leaders. Although there are similarities

between these two groups, there are also marked differences.

Managers are mostly involved in day-to-day work and are often responsible for handling regular job
problems and crisis management. Leaders, on the other hand, are visionaries who see a vision and

mission for an organization. They can motivate their employees to achieve the organizational goals by

steering them in the direction of those goals, which may include things beyond the basic structure of

the day-to-day work that people have been doing.

A leader must be able to help employees overcome their resistance to change. In addition, a leader

must create an ethical framework, show commitment, establish a positive role model, have good
communication skills and a positive in�uence over employees, and be persuasive enough to encourage

employees to perform above and beyond expectations.

Leadership quality is a key factor in the continuous improvement process because it helps improve

processes, decrease variance, decrease costs, and improve productivity.  Since quality initiatives can be

met with resistance, leadership is required in order to facilitate a successful quality improvement

initiative. 

There are a number of styles of leadership that have been identi�ed.  Some are more appropriate than
others in certain environments.  Review the Supplemental Media entitled “Leadership Styles” to learn

more about these leadership styles.

Additional Materials

View a Pdf Transcript of Leadership Styles 

(media/week3/SUO_BUS4101%20W3%20L3%20Leadership%20Styles ?

_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832)

https://myclasses.southuniversity.edu/content/enforced/90832-17106883/media/week3/SUO_BUS4101%20W3%20L3%20Leadership%20Styles ?_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832

Quality Culture Dimensions
Things Management Must Get Right

Some of the elements that will require management’s attention as it attempts to establish a quality culture
are as follows:

Business Environment
Is the environment of the organization oriented to change and quality improvement? For example, an
organization having a quality culture will have a business environment that naturally emphasizes
continuous improvement of processes, has a healthy workplace, focuses on customer satisfaction, and aims
at growing as a profitable company.

Organizational Values
Does the organization have quality-oriented values, ethics, and responsibilities? For example, all employees
of an organization having a quality culture will demonstrate an understanding of the organization’s quality
goals and values and work together to achieve them. Their attitude and behavior show that they understand
that what is good for the customers is good for the organization and its employees.

Cultural Role Models
Does the organization have cultural role models who uphold the organizational values? For example, in an
organization having a quality culture, the managers and leaders would be committed to the quality
standards. The employees of the organization may look up to these managers and leaders, see their attention
to quality, and be motivated to participate in the organization’s quality drive.

Organizational Customs
Is the organizational custom, including factors such as a dress code, employee interactions, and peer
relations, conducive to quality improvement? An important part of quality culture is to have well-groomed
and well-behaved employees, with a professional ambience.

Cultural Transmitters
Does the organization have the right people and mechanism to transmit the organizational culture from one
generation of employees to another? For example, an organization having a quality culture would have
appropriate and documented standards and guidelines that lead to continuous development of quality. In
addition, it must also have a system that trains and creates people who act as cultural transmitters.

© 2017 South University

Implementing Quality Initiatives

A Scenario

Let’s perform an activity to understand the critical mistakes that can be made in implementing a quality
plan. In this activity, you will review the details of a scenario and make appropriate decisions, wherever
required. You will also receive expert opinions on the decisions you will make. To make the best use of this
activity, make every decision considering its impact relative to such things as quality, company objective,
cost, effort, and time.

Bonjour Travels Private Limited is a medium-sized company. Recently, the company management has
come up with a plan for extending its business. As part of this plan, the company needs to implement total
quality management. Their objective is to gain a competitive advantage by providing outstanding an
customer experience.

Sam Marsh, the new quality assurance manager, is heading the company’s quality initiative. He has
proposed implementing a quality plan involving extensive changes to the processes followed by the
company. Most of these process changes are expected to happen in the customer service department of the
company.

Richard Dunning heads the customer service department of Bonjour. Sam has shared his quality plan with
Richard. Now, Richard needs to make some critical decisions related to implementing the quality initiative.

Richard: Sam is a new guy. He hardly knows the company and the business. The changes he suggested are
good to hear but too ambitious to implement. How can I just go and tell my team to receive each and every
customer call in less than three rings, always? How can I expect them to be aware of all the cultural
nuances while handling customers from almost all parts of the world? There will be a huge uproar over
these changes, and I am afraid it will be difficult to implement the changes within the stipulated time.
Moreover, why do we need to change what is already good and running well?

What would be the best thing for Richard to do?

Option 1: Being an experienced person, Richard knows the processes and functions of his department. If
he thinks the suggested changes are unrealistic, then the changes should not be implemented. Rather, they
should be sent back to Sam for reconsideration.
Feedback: Discarding the suggested changes will not allow the company to meet its objective of enhancing
customer experience. Therefore, this is not the best alternative.

Option 2: Richard should call a meeting for all the members of the customer service department and
discuss the suggested changes. Based on the team’s feedback, Richard should suggest modification ideas to
Sam.
Feedback: Richard’s dilemma shows that he does not understand the need for or the implications of the
quality changes. Without this understanding, any discussion with the other members in the customer service
department would lead to more confusion, apprehensions, and rejection. Therefore, this is not the best
alternative.

2 Implementing Quality Initiatives
A Scenario

Option 3: Richard should speak to Sam and also to the management, if required, and gain a clear
understanding of the quality initiative.
Feedback: Correct! Richard’s dilemma symbolizes fear, the most common factor in any quality
implementation initiative. Fear arises as a result of not knowing the importance, goals, objectives,
methodology, and expected outcome of the quality changes. And fear leads to resistance to change. Because
fear can be seen as a weakness, lack of knowledge, or lack of leadership skills, people sometimes do not
want to discuss their apprehensions. However, it is best for managers to understand the quality initiative in
detail and then make the appropriate decisions. Therefore, the best thing for Richard to do would be to
speak to Sam and the management, if required, and gain a better understanding of the entire quality
initiative. In general, fear can be avoided through training, good communication, and group meetings,
where everyone discusses the quality plan before it is implemented. Using check points, quality tools, and
benchmarks would also help. Managers can consider using Deming’s Fourteen Points to avoid making the
mistake of fearing quality changes.

Richard: Having discussed the quality plan with Sam, I now understand what he is trying to achieve. But I
don’t know if my team members are capable of meeting the quality requirements. How will I make all my
team members skilled in multicultural communication? Will Su Chang, the new employee from our Beijing
office, understand what it means to be “getting in my hair”?

What would be the best thing for Richard to do?

Option 1: Richard should make sure that in the quality plan, Sam includes the roles of the employees and
the skills and education needed for playing those roles. Accordingly, Richard can terminate the employees
who do not have the required education or skills and plan to hire more suitable people.
Feedback: Employee skills and education are critical to the success of any quality initiative, and, therefore,
it is a good idea to specify the different roles of the employees, as well as the required skills and education,
in the quality plan. It is also essential to recruit people who possess the required skills and education.
However, terminating employees who do not have the required efficiencies is harmful to the company’s
reputation and internal customer relations. It is also a cost-intensive affair. Therefore, this is not the best
alternative.

Option 2: Richard should make sure the quality plan is modified in order to match the skills and education
of the existing employees. Firing and hiring would not be a good way for the company to move toward
quality.
Feedback: Employee skills and education are critical to the success of any quality initiative. It is also
essential to recruit people who possess the required skills and education. However, rejecting or modifying
an otherwise robust quality plan because of issues related to employee skills and education is not conducive
to fulfilling the company’s objective. Therefore, this is not the best alternative.

Option 3: Richard should make sure that in the quality plan, Sam includes the roles of the employees and
the skills and education needed for playing those roles. Accordingly, the existing employees should receive
the required training. In addition, the required skills and education, as specified in the quality plan, should
be critical factors in any new recruitment.
Feedback: Correct! Employee skills and education are critical to the success of any quality initiative, and,
therefore, it is a good idea to specify the different roles of the employees, as well as the required skills and
education, in the quality plan. It is also essential to recruit people who possess the required skills and
education. However, terminating employees who do not have the required efficiencies is harmful to the

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Quality Management

©2017 South University

3 Implementing Quality Initiatives
A Scenario

company’s reputation and internal customer relations. It is also a cost-intensive affair. Similarly, rejecting
or modifying an otherwise robust quality initiative because of issues related to employee skills and
education is not conducive to fulfilling the company’s objective. Therefore, the best thing for Richard to do
would be to make sure existing employees receive the required training and that all future recruitments are
made as per the quality requirements.

Richard: The management has set a stringent deadline for implementing the quality changes. They are
desperate to see the results by the next financial year. Now that I understand the quality plan better, I must
say Sam has done a pretty good job, and the results should be positive. However, I think the plan lacks
adequate details of the technology required to meet some of the quality parameters, and this might cause
some challenges. If I do not know which software will be recommended for my team members, how can I
plan for the software training?

What would be the best thing for Richard to do?

Option 1: Meeting the time schedule is a critical factor in the success of any quality initiative. Therefore,
Richard should ignore the details as of now and proceed with the implementation process. The details can
be sorted out as and when they are required.
Feedback: Often, companies have an unrealistic time line, a lack of proper resources, or a lack of
expertise—all of which lead to an incomplete quality plan or a plan inappropriate for the particular
business. However, meeting the schedule at the expense of the plan is not a good idea because the company
may need to revise the plan midway or even abandon the entire quality initiative. In both cases, the
company will end up incurring unnecessary costs, losing time and effort, and not meeting the company’s
objective. Therefore, this is not the best alternative.

Option 2: Richard should proceed with the implementation process but make sure the management
reconsiders the time line. If they allow for more time, Richard should send the quality plan back to Sam for
reconsideration and ask him to provide all the necessary details. Otherwise, he should let the plan be
implemented within the stipulated schedule.
Feedback: Proceeding without a complete plan is not a good idea because the company may need to revise
the plan midway or even abandon the entire quality initiative. In both cases, the company will end up
incurring unnecessary costs, losing time and effort, and not meeting the company’s objective. Therefore,
this is not the best alternative.

Option 3: Richard should send the quality plan back to Sam for reconsideration and ask him to provide all
the necessary details. Having a complete plan before implementation is more critical than meeting the
schedule.
Feedback: Correct! Often, companies have an unrealistic time line, a lack of proper resources, or a lack of
expertise—all of which lead to an incomplete quality plan or a plan inappropriate for the particular
business. However, having a complete plan with all the required details is absolutely essential to the success
of a quality initiative. Otherwise, the company may need to revise the plan midway or even abandon the
entire quality initiative. In both cases, the company will end up incurring unnecessary costs, losing time and
effort, and not meeting the company’s objective. Therefore, the best thing for Richard to do would be to
send the quality plan back to Sam for reconsideration and to ask him to provide all the necessary details. In
addition, Richard can suggest regular meetings among all stakeholders to identify the required details,
improvement areas, possible risks, and recommendations.

Page 3 of 4

Quality Management
©2017 South University

4 Implementing Quality Initiatives
A Scenario

Richard: When all is said and done, I still have some misgivings about this plan. Why is my department
headed for the maximum amount of change? Does it mean my team members are the most inefficient? Why
do I and my team members need to struggle so much more than any other department? Sam and the
management surely could have done better with some more focus on the sales team rather than destroying
the customer service team with totally new standards, processes, and practices!

What would be the best thing for Richard to do?

Option 1: As an efficient manager and leader, Richard should consider what is in the best interest of his
team members and renegotiate the plan with Sam. He could try to convince Sam that Bonjour should focus
more on increasing sales in order to expand its business.
Feedback: Bonjour mainly aims to gain a competitive advantage by providing outstanding customer
experience and not so much by increasing sales. Therefore, this is not the best alternative.

Option 2: Sam is an expert in his job, and even Richard has admitted Sam has done a good job at creating
the quality plan. To raise questions about the focus of the plan would be like questioning Sam’s abilities. It
would also throw an unfavorable light toward Richard’s own capabilities as a manager and a leader.
Therefore, Richard should accept the plan as it is.
Feedback: Accepting the plan without resolving doubts (therefore, without proper understanding) might
lead to inconsistent implementation efforts, unwanted results, and even a failure of the quality management
initiative. Therefore, this is not the best alternative.

Option 3: Richard should have a meeting with Sam and the company management in order to understand
the focus of the plan. Then, he can recommend changes, if any.
Feedback: Correct! Richard’s dilemma shows that he does not have a clear understanding of the goals and
objectives of the plan. Bonjour aims to gain a competitive advantage by providing outstanding customer
experience and not so much by increasing sales. Accordingly, the quality plan focuses more on the
customer service department and suggests the maximum number of changes. This strategy definitely does
not imply the inefficiency of the department; rather, it reflects the company’s focus and its quality goals and
objectives. Therefore, it is imperative for Richard to get into a meeting with Sam and the company
management in order to understand and agree to the focus of the plan. In addition, Richard can ask Sam to
involve all stakeholders in making the goals and objectives clear and concise.

This activity has explained how fear, skill issues, an incomplete plan, or a lack of understanding may lead
to some of the most critical mistakes while you are attempting to implement a quality management
initiative. The final thing to remember in this regard is motivation. If there is a new management team, that
team might get a bit overzealous and forget to follow the steps in the quality plan. On the other hand, if
there is a stagnant and weathered management team, they might feel they do all right without the quality
plan, and, therefore, they really do not need to follow it. However, it is essential for the management to be
motivated enough to uphold, encourage, and implement the entire quality management initiative. The
management team should be trained so they feel comfortable and confident with the quality plan. Team
building activities and proactive participation can do wonders to motivate the management and all other
employees.

© 2017 South University

Page 4 of 4

Quality Management
©2017 South University

Implementing Total Quality Management

Quality is a buzzword in today’s competitive market. Organizations, big and small, have realized the

importance of quality management and are taking up multiple quality initiatives. However, a

considerable number of these initiatives fail to produce the expected results. Industry experts say

most of these failures happen not because of some inherent error in the quality plans, but because of
small mistakes that happen during the implementation. Therefore, it is important to be aware of such

critical mistakes and understand how best to avoid them.

Some of the most critical mistakes that occur in implementing a quality plan occur in the following

areas: 

Fear

Since some people are resistant to change, the need to alter processes and procedures often produces

fear in such people.  Whether the concern is in being unable to perform the new processes and
procedures or in being concerned about the loss of one’s position, fear can create obstacles for the

implementation of a quality plan. 

Lack of skills

In some organizations, those who are tasked with analyzing quality may not have the skills to

undertake such efforts.  Training must be provided in such cases. 

A Plan Being Incomplete

If some aspects of a plan are left vague (or not addressed at all), then the quality plan will not proceed

as smoothly as it could.  Obvious omissions should be recti�ed. 

Lack of Understanding

In some quality implementations, the rationale behind changes is never explained.  A person who does
not understand the purpose of changes to a process may be less likely to adopt the changes. 

Motivation

As with all work, motivation is needed to get people doing what the organization needs for them to do. 

Understanding the dif�culties in implementing quality plans can be illustrated using real-world

scenarios.  See the Supplemental Media entitled “Implementing Quality Initiatives” to see the issues

faced by one department manager as a quality plan threatened to force changes upon his department. 

Additional Materials

View a PDF transcript of Implementing Quality Initiatives 

(media/week5/SUO_BUS4101%20W5%20L3%20Implementing%20Quality%20Initiatives ?

_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832)

https://myclasses.southuniversity.edu/content/enforced/90832-17106883/media/week5/SUO_BUS4101%20W5%20L3%20Implementing%20Quality%20Initiatives ?_&d2lSessionVal=83vkmmrsczcH8ATfvgTLx0emF&ou=90832

BUS4101 Week 5 Project Rubric
Course: BUS4101-Quality Management SU01

Criteria
No

Submission

0 points

Emerging (F
through D Range)
(39-45)
45 points

Satisfactory (C
Range) (46-51)
51 points

Proficient (B
Range) (52-58)
58 points

Exemplary (A
Range) (59-65)
65 points

Criterion Score

Constructed a

House of

Quality.

/ 65Did not identify a

House of Quality

in any way.

Unsupported

with

research.

Identified a

House of Quality

generally, but did

not construct

one for the

company

selected.

Lacked credible

research support.

Constructed

portion of a

House of Quality,

but left other

elements

incomplete.

Weakly

supported with

research.
Constructed a

House of Quality.

Sufficiently

supported with
research.
Constructed a

fully formed

House of Quality,

with all relevant

matrices

completed.

Well supported

by research.

Criteria
No Submission
0 points

Emerging (F
through D Range)
(24-28)
28 points

Satisfactory (C
Range) (28-32)
32 points

Proficient (B
Range) (32-36)
36 points

Exemplary (A
Range) (36-40)
40 points

Criterion Score

Criteria
No Submission
0 points
Emerging (F
through D Range)
(24-28)
28 points
Satisfactory (C
Range) (28-32)
32 points
Proficient (B
Range) (32-36)
36 points
Exemplary (A
Range) (36-40)
40 points
Criterion Score

Developed

SPC checklists

for each

dimension of

the product

subject to

statistical

control.

/ 40Did not identify

any SPC

checklists.

Unsupported

with research.

Outlined SPC

checklists that

did not appear to

be related to the

product under

consideration.

Lacked credible
research support.

Developed SPC

checklists for

some dimensions

of the product,

but failed to

construct them

for other

dimensions that

would obviously

be subject to

statistical
control.
Weakly
supported with
research.
Developed SPC
checklists for

each dimension

of the product

subject to
statistical
control.
Sufficiently
supported with
research.
Developed SPC
checklists that

demonstrate

insight into the

processes being

managed.

Well supported
by research.
Criteria
No Submission
0 points
Emerging (F
through D Range)
(24-28)
28 points
Satisfactory (C
Range) (28-32)
32 points
Proficient (B
Range) (32-36)
36 points
Exemplary (A
Range) (36-40)
40 points
Criterion Score

Criteria
No Submission
0 points
Emerging (F
through D Range)
(24-28)
28 points
Satisfactory (C
Range) (28-32)
32 points
Proficient (B
Range) (32-36)
36 points
Exemplary (A
Range) (36-40)
40 points
Criterion Score

Evaluated the

product using

the Kaizen

five-

step plan.

/ 40Did not identify

Kaizen.

Unsupported
with research.

Identified Kaizen.

Lacked credible
research support.

Described

Kaizen.
Weakly
supported with
research.
Evaluated the
product using

the Kaizen five-

step plan.
Sufficiently
supported with
research.

Insightfully

evaluated the

Kaizen five-step

plan for the

process that

produces the

product.

Well supported
by research.
Criteria
No Submission
0 points
Emerging (F
through D Range)
(24-28)
28 points
Satisfactory (C
Range) (28-32)
32 points
Proficient (B
Range) (32-36)
36 points
Exemplary (A
Range) (36-40)
40 points
Criterion Score

Criteria
No Submission
0 points
Emerging (F
through D Range)
(24-28)
28 points
Satisfactory (C
Range) (28-32)
32 points
Proficient (B
Range) (32-36)
36 points
Exemplary (A
Range) (36-40)
40 points
Criterion Score

Determined

what

characteristics

and

activities

would be

subject to

benchmarking

and proposed

organizations

against which

such

benchmarking

could be done.

/ 40Did not identify
characteristics
and activities

that are subject

to benchmarking.

Unsupported
with research.

Identified

characteristics

and activities.

Lacked credible
research support.
Described
characteristics
and activities.
Weakly
supported with
research.
Determined
what
characteristics
and activities

would be subject

to benchmarking,

and proposed
organizations

against which to

benchmark.

Sufficiently
supported with
research.

Offered

compelling

determination as

to why the

activities

selected for

benchmarking

were chosen,

including world

class leaders

against whom

benchmarking

could take place.

Well supported
by research.
Criteria
No Submission
0 points

Emerging (F
through D Range)
(6-7)
7 points

Satisfactory (C
Range) (7-8)
8 points

Proficient (B
Range) (8-9)
9 points

Exemplary (A
Range) (9-10)
10 points

Criterion Score

Criteria
No Submission
0 points
Emerging (F
through D Range)
(6-7)
7 points
Satisfactory (C
Range) (7-8)
8 points
Proficient (B
Range) (8-9)
9 points
Exemplary (A
Range) (9-10)
10 points
Criterion Score

Communicatio

n: Use of tone,

word choice,

audience,

transitions,

and

progression of

ideas.

/ 10Submission

contained no

discernible

overall intent in

author’s

selection of

ideas.
Submission

contained

random

presentation of

ideas, which

prevented

understanding

the majority of

author’s overall

intent.

Ideas presented

in a way that

forced the reader

to make repeated

inferences in

order to identify

and

follow the

author’s overall
intent.

The reader could

follow the
author’s overall

intent as stated.

The writer’s

overall argument

and language

were clear and

tightly focused,

leaving the

reader with no

room for

confusion about

author’s intent.

Criteria
No Submission
0 points
Emerging (F
through D Range)
(6-7)
7 points
Satisfactory (C
Range) (7-8)
8 points
Proficient (B
Range) (8-9)
9 points
Exemplary (A
Range) (9-10)
10 points
Criterion Score

Criteria
No Submission
0 points
Emerging (F
through D Range)
(6-7)
7 points
Satisfactory (C
Range) (7-8)
8 points
Proficient (B
Range) (8-9)
9 points
Exemplary (A
Range) (9-10)
10 points
Criterion Score

Mechanics:

Use of

grammar,

sentence

structure, and

spelling.

/ 10

Errors in basic

writing

conventions

were sufficiently

numerous to

prevent reader

comprehension.

Errors in basic
writing
conventions
were sufficiently
numerous to
prevent reader

comprehension

of majority of the

work.

Errors in basic
writing
conventions

interfered with,

but did not

prevent, reader

comprehension.

The reader

noticed a few

errors in basic

writing

conventions but

these few errors

did not interfere

with reader

comprehension.

Test was

basically error

free, so that a

reader would

have to

purposely search

to find any errors

that may be

present.

Criteria
No Submission
0 points

Emerging (F
through D Range)
(12-14)
14 points

Satisfactory (C
Range) (14-16)
16 points

Proficient (B
Range) (16-18)
18 points

Exemplary (A
Range) (18-20)
20 points

Criterion Score

Criteria
No Submission
0 points
Emerging (F
through D Range)
(12-14)
14 points
Satisfactory (C
Range) (14-16)
16 points
Proficient (B
Range) (16-18)
18 points
Exemplary (A
Range) (18-20)
20 points
Criterion Score

Academic/APA

/PPT

Formatting

Use of

citations,

references, and

structural

formatting

including such

elements as

title page,

running head,

page numbers,

headings, title

slides,

graphics, data,

notes section,

(as

appropriate),

introduction,

and conclusio

/ 20No attempt at

Academic/APA/P

PT formatting in

presentation.

Academic/APA/P

PT format

attempted, but

errors were

significant,

preventing

comprehension

of message.

Academic/APA/P
PT format

attempted but

errors were

distracting.

Used

Academic/APA/P
PT format

accurately. Errors

noticeable but

minor.

Used
Academic/APA/P
PT format

proficiently.

Work basically

error free.

Total / 225

Overall Score

No Submission
0 points minimum

Emerging (F through D Range)
157 points minimum

Satisfactory (C Range)
179 points minimum

Proficient (B Range)
202 points minimum

Exemplary (A Range)
225 points minimum

BUS4101 Week 5 Project $20.00

Instructions

Quality Analysis, Part 2

For the company and product or service that you selected for the W3 Project, complete the following:

Imagining yourself to be viewing the company’s product or service through the eyes of the customer, construct a House of Quality to provide the organization with your perspectives on what the important dimensions of quality are and how well the organization is currently meeting your needs.

Develop a SPC checklist for each dimension of the product that you believe would be subject to statistical control.

Evaluate the product using the five-step plan that is associated with the Kaizen philosophy.

Propose what elements of the production and delivery of the product or service would be subject to benchmarking and how you would identify those organizations to which comparisons could be made in a benchmarking process.

Submission Details:

Submit your report in a three- to four-page Word document, using APA style.

Submit it to the Submissions Area by the due date assigned.

Name your document SUO_BUS4101_W5_ LastName_FirstInitial .

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