Posted: September 18th, 2022

Complete the Historical Analysis Worksheet, working through a five-step critical thinking process for analyzing and synthesizing the evidence you collected related to your topic.

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 Complete the Historical Analysis Worksheet, working through a five-step critical thinking process for analyzing and synthesizing the evidence you collected related to your topic. 

Complete the Historical Analysis Worksheet, working through a five-step critical thinking process for analyzing and synthesizing the evidence you collected related to your topic.

Introduction

Note: The first three assessments in this course build on each other; therefore, it is essential that you complete them in the order presented.

In the first assessment, you located and analyzed primary and secondary sources about a historical event, issue, or movement. This second assessment focuses on evaluating and synthesizing the information you have collected from your sources. During this process, you will apply your critical thinking skills, which is an essential part of problem solving.

Historians use problem solving to better understand the past, but they also use it to understand key historical figures—from the suffragettes to members of the #MeToo movement and from the Knights of Labor to today’s labor and business leaders—continue to use it today to change the course of history. Using critical thinking to solve problems outside of this course could help you, for example, propose a solution to address nursing mothers’ rights at work, decide how to put a positive spin on an employment gap at a job interview, or even consider how skills you’ve learned in past Capella courses have impacted your current success. Understanding how to apply critical thinking to solve problems in any personal or professional situation you encounter will help you take control of your own life to achieve the future you want.

Note: The first three assessments in this course build on each other; therefore, it is essential that you complete them in the order presented.

Overview

Now that you’ve evaluated the credibility of your sources (Assessment 1), you are ready to use innovative thinking and problem solving to analyze the content of your sources. For this assessment, you will complete the 

Historical Analysis Worksheet [DOCX]

, using a critical thinking process to evaluate evidence as you explore the causes and long-term impacts related to your issue. Analyze how those in the past have successfully and unsuccessfully tackled the same issues while also considering how these same issues might now be addressed by your organization.

Preparation

Review the evidence you compiled and compared for Assessment 1, Evaluating Historical Sources. Then begin to formulate your explanation or main arguments about your chosen issue. Consider the historical context of the issue, its challenges, and the strategies and approaches people used to deal with those challenges.

Instructions

For this assessment, use the 

Historical Analysis Worksheet [DOCX]
 to complete the following steps. You will use this worksheet to further examine the sources you’ve collected for your topic (facing economic change or engaging civil rights).

Step 1: 

Identify questions that need to be answered to understand a historical event and its long-term impact.

Step 2: 

Describe information learned from historical sources that can be used to inform a current understanding of a historical issue.

Step 3: 

Explain similarities and differences in sources of historical information.

Step 4: 

Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of historical evidence, including the challenges of using such evidence to make an argument about a historical issue.

Step 5: 

Use critical thinking to relate past challenges and strategies to a current organizational issue.

Step 6: 

Write in a well-organized and concise manner that adheres to the rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics.

Additional Requirements

Your submission should meet the following requirements:

Written communication: Written communication should be free of errors that detract from the overall message.

Citations: Include a complete citation for each source. When you refer to evidence (in Step 2 of the worksheet), be sure to include in-text references to your sources. Review 

Evidence and APA

 for more information on how to cite your sources.

Number of references: Your assessment should include a reference page with at least four sources cited: two primary and two secondary sources, with up to two sources selected from the 

History Presentation Resource List [DOCX]

.

Font and font-size: Times New Roman, 12 point.

Competencies Measured

By successfully completing this assessment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and assessment criteria:

Competency 2: Determine the causes and long-term impacts of a historical event. 

Identify questions that need to be answered to understand a historical event and its long-term impact.
Explain similarities and differences in sources of historical information.

Competency 3: Explain lessons learned from U.S. historical events and their potential influence on a current problem or situation. 

Describe information learned from historical sources that can be used to inform a current understanding of a historical issue.
Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of historical evidence, including the challenges of using such evidence to make an argument about a historical issue.
Use critical thinking to relate past challenges and strategies to a current organizational issue.

Competency 4: Address assessment purpose in a well-organized manner, incorporating appropriate evidence and tone in grammatically sound sentences. 

Write in a well-organized and concise manner that adheres to the rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics.

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Historical Analysis Worksheet

Use this worksheet to further examine the sources you’ve collected for your topic (facing economic change or engaging civil rights). Work through a critical thinking process to assess what you’ve learned and formulate an explanation or argument about your topic. Respond to each of the questions highlighted below, typing your responses in complete sentences. Following your responses, include a reference list with citations of your sources.

Step 1 KNOWLEDGE: Identify the argument or the problem that needs to be solved. Questions should be asked to acquire a deep understanding about the problem.

What is the question you need to answer in your presentation?

What are some focused questions you can ask to have a deeper understanding of the topic? Include at least two questions.

Step

2

COMPREHENSION: Understand the situation or issue and the facts aligned with it using the sources you collected and the course material. If needed, locate additional sources that align with your topic.

1. What have you learned about your topic in present-day America so far?

· What have you learned about your historical issues and the context in which they occurred that can help you better understand that same issue today?

What are some facts or evidence you will use to help inform your presentation to your nonprofit group?

· What evidence is missing? Where might you find it?

Step 3 APPLICATION: Build a linkage between the information and resources. Using the information above, answer the following questions:

1. Are there any links or similarities you see in your sources of information? What are they?

· Are there any discrepancies?

Step 4 ANALYZE: Analyze in order to identify the situation or issue, the strong points, the weak points, and the challenges faced while solving the problem.

1. What are your strong pieces of evidence?

What are your weak pieces of evidence?

What challenges do you have in using this evidence to make an argument about your issue?

Step 5 SYNTHESIS: Summarize your argument around the issue or situation, and be sure to include the main ideas that need to be communicated to your group. Make sure you are answering the question you identified in Step 1 of this worksheet.

Summarize your argument:

References

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History Presentation Resource List

Primary and Secondary Historical Sources

Primary Sources: Facing Economic Change

History Matters. (n.d.).

“Sir I will thank you with all my heart”: Seven letters from the Great Migration

. http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/

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332/

Roosevelt, F. D. (1933, March 12).

On the bank crisis

[Radio address]. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. http://docs.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/031233.html

Roosevelt, F. D. (1938, April 14).

F.D.R. on economic conditions/12th fireside address

. History Central. https://www.historycentral.com/documents/FDRTwelthfireside.html

Library of Congress. (n.d.).

American memory timeline

. http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/index.html

Kleinfield, N. R. (1983, September 26).

American way of life altered by fuel crisis

.
The New York Times. http://library.capella.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fsearch.proquest.com%2Fdocview%2F424767573%3Faccountid%3D27965

Library of Congress. (n.d.).

American life histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936 to 1940: Articles and essays

. https://www.loc.gov/collections/federal-writers-project/articles-and-essays/

Facing History and Ourselves. (n.d.).

Firsthand accounts of the Great Depression

. https://www.facinghistory.org/mockingbird/firsthand-accounts-great-depression

Wadler, J. (2009, April 2).

And still, they prospered

.
The New York Times. http://library.capella.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fsearch.proquest.com%2Fdocview%2F434065466%3Faccountid%3D27965

American Experience. (n.d.).

A Dust Bowl survivor

. PBS. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/surviving-the-dust-bowl-interview-survivor/

Library of Congress. (n.d.).

Inside an American factory: Films of the Westinghouse Works, 1904

. https://www.loc.gov/collections/films-of-westinghouse-works-1904/about-this-collection/

Library of Congress. (n.d.).

National Child Labor Committee collection

. https://www.loc.gov/collections/national-child-labor-committee/about-this-collection/

Secondary Sources: Facing Economic Change

1. Cwiek, S. (2014).

The middle class took off 100 years ago…thanks to Henry Ford?

NPR. https://www.npr.org/2014/01/27/267145552/the-middle-class-took-off-100-years-ago-thanks-to-henry-ford

2. Gates, Jr., H. L. (2013).

Madam Walker, the first black American woman to be a self-made millionaire

. PBS. https://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/100-amazing-facts/madam-walker-the-first-black-american-woman-to-be-a-self-made-millionaire/

3. Wilkerson, I. (2016).

The road to freedom

.
Smithsonian,
47(5), 38–102. http://library.capella.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=117744069&site=ehost-live&scope=site

4. Goldschein, E. (2011, August 29).

10 lessons from people who lived through the depression

.
Business Insider. https://www.businessinsider.com/lessons-from-people-who-lived-through-the-depression-2011-8

5. Mauldin, J. (2018).

The 2020s might be the worst decade in U.S. history

.
Forbes. https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnmauldin/2018/05/24/the-2020s-might-be-the-worst-decade-in-u-s-history/#4edfb05e48d3

6. Smithsonian National Museum of American History. (n.d.).

Energy crisis

. https://americanhistory.si.edu/american-enterprise-exhibition/consumer-era/energy-crisis

7. Geier, B. (2015, March 12).

What did we learn from the dotcom stock bubble of 2000?

Time. https://time.com/3741681/2000-dotcom-stock-bust/

8. Lumen Learning. (n.d.).

Conclusion: Post-war America

. Boundless US History. https://courses.lumenlearning.com/boundless-ushistory/chapter/conclusion-post-war-america/

Primary Sources: Women’s History

1. Truth, S. (1851).

Ain’t I a woman?

[Speech]. Internet Modern History Sourcebook, Fordham University. https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/mod/sojtruth-woman.asp

1. Anthony, S. B. (1873).

Women’s right to vote

[Speech]. Internet Modern History Sourcebook, Fordham University. https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/mod/1873anthony.asp

1. Addams, J. (1915).

Why women should vote, 1915

[Pamphlet]. Internet Modern History Sourcebook, Fordham University. https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/mod/1915janeadams-vote.asp

1. The New York Times. (1919, June 5).

The passage of the 19th Amendment, 1919–1920

. Internet Modern History Sourcebook, Fordham University. https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/mod/1920womensvote.asp

1. Feminist Majority Foundation. (2014).

National organization for women: Statement of purpose

. http://www.feminist.org/research/chronicles/early1.html

Secondary Sources: Women’s History

1. Michals, D. (Ed.). (2015).

Alice Paul (1885–1977)

. National Women’s History Museum. https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/alice-paul

AmericanExperiencePBS. (2017).

Alice Paul: The great war

[Video]. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgY_8QwZX4s

Primary Sources: Native American History

1. The University of Oklahoma, Western History Collections. (n.d.).

Doris Duke collection

. https://digital.libraries.ou.edu/whc/duke/

1. Yale Law School, Lillian Goldman Law Library, the Avalon Project. (2008).

Treaties between the United States and Native Americans

. https://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/ntreaty.asp

1. Yale Law School, Lillian Goldman Law Library, the Avalon Project. (2008).

Statutes of the United States concerning Native Americans

. https://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/namenu.asp

Secondary Sources: Native American History

1. U.S. National Library of Medicine. (1994). “

If you knew the conditions…”: Health care to Native Americans

. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/if_you_knew/index.html

1. History.com. (2019).

Native American history timeline

. https://www.history.com/topics/native-american-history/native-american-timeline

1. History.com. (2020).

Trail of Tears

. https://www.history.com/topics/native-american-history/trail-of-tears

1. Gambino, L. (2017, March 10).

Native Americans take Dakota Access pipeline protest to Washington

.
The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/mar/10/native-nations-march-washington-dakota-access-pipeline

1. Smith-Schoenwalder, C. (2019, July 2).

The battle for the Grand Canyon

.
U.S. News and World Report. https://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2019-07-02/all-eyes-on-uranium-around-the-grand-canyon

1. Weiser, K. (2019).

Cochise – Strong Apache leader

. Legends of America. https://www.legendsofamerica.com/na-cochise/

Primary Sources: African American History

1. Teaching Tolerance. (n.d.).

Slaves’ petition for freedom to the Massachusetts legislature (1777).

https://www.tolerance.org/classroom-resources/texts/hard-history/slaves-petition-for-freedom-to-the-massachusetts-legislature

2. National Archives, Founders Online. (n.d.).

To Thomas Jefferson from Benjamin Banneker, 19 August 1791

. https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-22-02-0049

3. Douglass, F. (1852).

The hypocrisy of American slavery, July 4, 1852

[Speech]. Internet Modern History Sourcebook, Fordham University. https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/mod/douglass-hypo.asp

4. Washington, B. T. (1895).

Booker T. Washington (1856–1915): Speech at the Atlanta Exposition, 1895

[Speech]. Internet Modern History Sourcebook, Fordham University. https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/mod/1895washington-atlanta.asp

5. History Matters. (n.d.).

W.E.B. DuBois critiques Booker T. Washington

. http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/40

6. Smith, S., Ellis, K., & Aslanian, S. (2001).

Remembering Jim Crow

[Documentary]. American Public Media. http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/remembering/index.html

7. National Humanities Center. (n.d.).

The Montgomery bus boycott and the women who started it: The memoir of Jo Ann Gibson Robinson

. http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/maai3/protest/text5/robinsonbusboycott

8. National Humanities Center. (n.d.).

Walter F. White: I investigate lynchings

. http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/maai3/segregation/text2/investigatelynchings

9. United States House of Representatives, History, Art & Archives. (n.d.).

The civil rights movement and the second reconstruction, 1945–1968.

https://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Essays/Keeping-the-Faith/Civil-Rights-Movement/

10. King, Jr., M. L. (1963).

“I have a dream,” address delivered at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

[Speech]. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute, Stanford University. https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/i-have-dream-address-delivered-march-washington-jobs-and-freedom

11. Malcolm X. (1964, April 3).

The ballot or the bullet

[Speech]. SoJust. http://www.sojust.net/speeches/malcolm_x_ballot.html

Secondary Sources: African-American History

1. Black Lives Matter. (n.d.).

Herstory

. https://blacklivesmatter.com/herstory/

Simon, C. (2018, July 16).

Black lives matter has shown hashtags matter, too

.
USA Today. http://library.capella.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fsearch.proquest.com%2Fdocview%2F2070082770%3Faccountid%3D27965

NPR. (2008, June 5).

Obama triumph: A turning point for America?

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91181127

Primary Sources: Immigrant History

1. Our Documents.gov. (n.d.).

Chinese Exclusion Act (1882)

. https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=false&doc=47

2. National Archives. (n.d.).

Our documented rights: Thinking about Chinese exclusion

. https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/chinese-exclusion.html

3. Chinese American Museum. (n.d.).

Life before exclusion

. http://camla.org/chinese-exclusion-act/

4. U.S. Department of State, Office of the Historian. (n.d.).

Chinese immigration and the Chinese Exclusion Acts

. https://history.state.gov/milestones/1866-1898/chinese-immigration

5. U.S. Department of State, Office of the Historian. (n.d.).

The Immigration Act of 1924 (The Johnson-Reed Act)

. https://history.state.gov/milestones/1921-1936/immigration-act

6. Digital History. (n.d.).

Immigration Restriction Act of 1924

. http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtID=3&psid=1116

7. National Park Service. (n.d.).

The Statue of Liberty: The new colossus

. https://www.nps.gov/stli/learn/historyculture/colossus.htm

8. Horne, M. (2019).

20 Ellis Island immigration photos that capture the hope and diversity of new arrivals

. History.com. https://www.history.com/news/ellis-island-immigration-photos-diversity

9. Burke, M. (2016).

The American dream is alive and well…on the Forbes 400

.
Forbes,
198(5), 58–74. http://library.capella.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=118439921&site=ehost-live&scope=site

10. Sesin, C. (2018, December 26).

Through immigrant stories, a portrait of America. NBC News

. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/through-immigrant-stories-portrait-america-n948246

Secondary Sources: Immigrant History

1. Felter, C., Renwick, D., & Cheatham, A. (2020).

Renewing America: The U.S. immigration debate

. Council on Foreign Relations. https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/us-immigration-debate-0

Robinson, D. (2019).

The immigration debate: Closing the distance between legal requirements and humanitarian instincts is a global, rather than national, enterprise

.
The Foreign Service Journal. https://www.afsa.org/immigration-debate

ProCon.org. (2019).

Should the government allow immigrants who are here illegally to become U.S. citizens?

https://immigration.procon.org/

NBC News. (n.d.).

Immigration & the border

. https://www.nbcnews.com/immigration-border-crisis

Constitutional Rights Foundation. (2018).

Educating about immigration: History lesson 1: History of immigration through 1850s

. http://www.crfimmigrationed.org/lessons-for-teachers/71-immigrant-article-1

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