Posted: September 18th, 2022

Discussion Topic: Psychology of Abnormal Behavior What is considered “abnormal” behavior to you? Have you seen or experienced abnormal behaviors of others, either at work, around town or in your personal life? Explain why or why not you believe the beh

ABNORMALPSYCHLA108-44Winter22syllabus1 xKearney_3e_PPT_Ch02-Tagged
 

Discussion Topic: Psychology of Abnormal Behavior 

What is considered “abnormal” behavior to you?  Have you seen or experienced abnormal behaviors of others, either at work, around town or in your personal life? Explain why or why not you believe the behavior is normal or abnormal. 

At Least 250 words. 

Course Materials 

Kearney. C & Trull. T, Abnormal Psychology and Life: A Dimensional Approach, 3rd edition.  

Cengage, 2018 -ISBN: 9781337273572( Mind Tap)


LA 108-44 Psychology

Winter 22 Semester

Professor Kaneez Naseem

Course Description

This course examines certain types of abnormal behavior and teaches students to classify the development, maintenance, and effects of the behavior. The major areas covered include anxiety and stress, dissociative and somatoform disorders, personality and impulse control disorders, psychoactive substance use disorders, sexual disorders, schizophrenia, and suicide.

Instructor’s Contact Information:

Email me using the Blackboard course email message feature (quickest way to reach me)

Phone: (646)374-8005 (Leave a clear message with name, phone, and contact number)

College email: Please log into your course and email me using the course messages via Blackboard. If you cannot for some reason, my college email is jsuh@monroecollege.edu.

Course Information:

Office Location: Online

Office Hours: Sundays – 12:15PM to 1:15pm. (EST time zone). Hours/days will vary at times which will be announced in advanced.

Prerequisites

LA 101.

Learning Objectives

• Students will identify models for defining and determining the possible causes of abnormal behavior through class discussions.

• Students will examine the methods for classification and assessment of abnormal behaviors through quizzes.

• Students will differentiate disorders of anxiety and stress through research papers.

• Students will investigate information relating to personality, conduct, substance abuse, and sexual disorders through research papers.

• Students will develop a better understanding of mood disorders, forms of depression, schizophrenia, and their relationship to suicide through written assignments and research projects.

• Students will examine the types of organic brain disorders, mental retardation, and disorders peculiar to childhood and adolescence through research papers.

Course Materials

Kearney. C & Trull. T,
Abnormal Psychology and Life: A Dimensional Approach, 3rd edition.

Cengage, 2018 -ISBN: 9781337273572( Mind Tap)

Outline

I Study of abnormal behavior – definitions, criteria, incidence, historical perspectives, and possible causes.

II Models of Abnormal Psychology – biogenic, psychoanalytic, humanistic, behavioral, family systems, and the classification of disorders.

III Methods of Assessment – observation, interviews, testing, experiments, placebos, correlations, field and single subject studies.

IV Anxiety and Stress – panic disorders, phobias, obsessive-compulsive behavior, posttraumatic stress disorder, dissociative, somatoform, and psychological factors in physical disorders

V Disorders Involving Conduct – personality, impulse control, alcohol use, drug and substance use, gender identity, paraphilias, sexual deviations, and sexual dysfunctional disorders.

VI Mood and Thought Disorders – depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, and suicide.

VII Organic and Developmental Disorders – organic brain disorders, mental retardation, disorders of childhood and adolescence: autism, disruptive behaviors, ADHD, tic disorders, eating disorders, separation anxiety disorder, substance abuse, and childhood depression

VIII Therapies – individual and group: biology-based, insight-oriented, and psychotherapy, family and marital therapies, prevention programs and community psychology.

IX Legal and Ethical Issues – institutional, civil and criminal; therapist-client relationship.

Monroe College Attendance Policy for Undergraduate Lecture Classes

Rationale

Central to the mission of Monroe College is the provision of career-focused higher education that prepares a diverse student body for positions in a wide range of professional work settings. Our educational approach is personal and hands-on. Interaction among students and faculty in our classrooms supports the development of knowledge and skills for academic success and professional development. Therefore, consistent attendance, punctuality, and active participation are highly valued. The practices and guidelines outlined in this policy intend to support those values. Faculty and students are always welcome to discuss the implementation of this policy in specific instances with Dr. Karenann Carty, Vice President of Academic Affairs, at (646) 393-8772.

Documented Absences

The College understands that situations arise that may interfere with attendance and are beyond the control of the student. These include, but are not limited to, medical emergencies for the student or members of their family, an important legal obligation, military deployment, job-related obligations, or the unfortunate passing of a loved one. In such cases, a student may provide timely documentation for the related absence to the Office of Academic Affairs, which will review the circumstances and record the absence as “documented” when warranted (denoted on the student’s attendance record with a “D”). The student will be permitted and encouraged to make up any missed exams or assignments.

Sanctioned Absences

Occasionally, a student may miss a class because he or she is representing the College or their School at a conference, an academic or athletic competition, or a co-curricular event. These valuable experiences enhance student learning and achievement. In such cases, the Office of Academic Affairs records the absence as “sanctioned” (denoted on the student’s attendance record with an “S”). The student will be permitted and encouraged to make up any missed exams or assignments.

Absence Guidelines

For undergraduate lecture classes, the College has set the following guidelines for absences that are neither sanctioned nor documented:

• Online/Module classes: two absences

• Classes that meet once per week: two absences
• Classes that meet two or more times per week: four absences

Online Specific Policies

Online Attendance Policy

Students will be considered present if he/she meets any of the following:
• Submission of an assignment, exam or project
• Participation in the Discussion Forum
• Participation in a Live Chat / Office Hour via Blackboard Collaborate Ultra

The Discussion Forum

An asynchronous (non-live) threaded discussion board where the instructor and the students are able to discuss specific course topics to allow interaction, exchange of opinions, and sharing of knowledge. The instructor will post a topic of discussion on the Discussion Forum regarding a specific course topic and students are to post their responses. The students can respond to the instructor and to their classmates. Students can also ask questions in relation to the topic being discussed. Postings not related to the discussion at hand are not permitted in the Discussion Forum and will be deleted. Students are also required to observe Net etiquette and not use inappropriate language.

Note
:

Initial Posting must be submitted by
5pm on Wednesdays and responses must be posted by
5pm on Sunday

.

Online Chats and Office Hours via Blackboard Collaborate

The Online Chat is a synchronous (live) discussion and will be scheduled by the professor. The discussion works basically the same way discussions are done in a class except that this is online. All chat sessions will utilize Blackboard Collaborate and will be recorded.

Assignment Submissions

All assignments must be submitted through the Weekly Drop Boxes.

Assignments submitted after the posted due date may be penalized up to 10 points each day the assignment is late
.

Late submissions

Assignments, quizzes, exams, and discussions submitted after the posted due date will be penalized up to 10 points each day the assignment is late
.

No email submissions will be accepted nor graded. All work must be submitted via the weekly drop box/links provided within each weekly folders.

Midterm exam and Final exam must be submitted on time. No exceptions.

Accommodative Services

Monroe College is accessible to students with disabilities and admits those students whose credentials demonstrate they have the motivation and capabilities to successfully pursue

their academic goals at the college. All students with disabilities have access to a Coordinator of Services
for Students with Disabilities on each campus:

Bronx Campus:
Bronx Campus:
Tina Serrano tserrano@monroecollege.edu

New Rochelle Campus:
Saadia Del-Llano sdelllano@monroecollege.edu

Course Assessment

List all assessments in the course with the corresponding points/percentage associated with the assessment category

Assignment/Assessment

Percentage toward final grade

Discussions
20%
Classroom Assignments
20%
Quizzes
20%
Midterm exam
20%
Final exam
20%

College Grading Scale

A
90-100
B+
85-89
B
80-84
C+
75-79
C
70-74
D+
65-69
D
60-64
F
Less than 60

Code of Academic and Scholarly Integrity

Monroe College is an academic community. Its fundamental purpose is the pursuit of knowledge in preparation for a career and for life. Essential to the success of this educational mission is a commitment to the principles of academic integrity. Every member of the college community is responsible for upholding the highest standards of honesty at all times. Students, as members of the community, are also responsible for adhering to the principles and spirit of the following Code of Academic and Scholarly Integrity.

Activities that have the effect or intention of interfering with education, pursuit of knowledge, or fair evaluation of a student’s performance are prohibited. Examples of such activities include, but are not limited to, the following definitions:

A. Cheating: Using or attempting to use unauthorized assistance, material, or study aids in examinations or other academic work or preventing, or attempting to prevent, another from using authorized assistance, material, or study aids. Example: using a cheat sheet in a quiz or exam, altering a graded exam and resubmitting it for a better grade, using an electronic device to obtain assistance during an examination, etc.

B. Plagiarism: Using the ideas, data, or language of another without specific or proper acknowledgment. Example: copying another person’s paper, article, or computer work and submitting it for an assignment, cloning someone else’s ideas without attribution, failing to use quotation marks where appropriate, etc.

All written work will be placed through SafeAssign. Work will not be graded if students do not submit written work through SafeAssign. Students must resubmit as soon as possible. Please check your grade feedback regularly.

C. Fabrication: Submitting contrived or altered information in any academic exercise. Example: making up data for an experiment, falsifying data, citing nonexistent articles, contriving sources, etc.

D. Multiple Submissions: Submitting, without prior permission, any work submitted to fulfill another academic requirement at Monroe or any other institution.

E. Misrepresentation of academic records: Misrepresenting or tampering with or attempting to tamper with any portion of a student’s transcript or academic record, either before or after coming to Monroe College. Example: forging a change of grade slip, tampering with computer records, falsifying academic information on one’s resume, etc.

F. Facilitating academic dishonesty: Knowingly helping or attempting to help another violate any provision of the Code. Example: working together on a take-home exam without prior permission from the instructor, etc.

G. Unfair advantage: Attempting to gain unauthorized advantage over fellow students in an academic exercise. Example: gaining or providing unauthorized access to examination materials, obstructing or interfering with another student’s efforts in an academic exercise, lying about a need for an extension for an exam or paper, continuing to write even when time is up during an exam, destroying or keeping library materials for one’s own use, etc.

Penalties
: Students who violate the Code of Academic and Scholarly Integrity may be subject to a grade of “F” for the work submitted, an “F” in the course, written reprimands in the student’s academic file, probation, suspension, or dismissal from the College.

Students are expected to be fully aware of the College’s requirements and expectations regarding academic honesty and scholarly integrity. If a student is unsure whether his action(s) constitute a violation of the Code of Academic and Scholarly Integrity, then it is that student’s responsibility to consult with the instructor to clarify any ambiguities.

Student Evaluations of Course and Instructor

Monroe College students have an important voice in the academic community and an obligation to give an honest assessment of their instruction and coursework. As an expectation of every course, students will complete an anonymous, online course evaluation questionnaire. By doing so, students provide information used to enhance the relevance of the course content and effectiveness of the instruction you experienced. The course evaluation period will be announced by the Academic Office during the course of the semester

Topics Outline

Date

Class Topic/Description

Activities and/or Assignments

Course Learning Objective

Week 1
Introductions- Post your greetings in your discussion forum.
Discussion Forum
Purchase your textbook
Greetings and class introductions
Week 2
Read Chapters 1 and 2- Discuss abnormality and elements of abnormal behavior.
Historical viewpoints

Discussion Forum
Assignment
Define abnormality
Understand historical events and viewpoints
Explain elements of abnormality
Week 3
Read Chapters 3 & 4
Diathesis-Stress Model
Epidemiology of Mental Disorders
Risk, Protective Factors, and Resilience
Culture and Clinical Assessment
Discussion Forum
Assignment
Defining Abnormal Behavior and Mental Disorder
DSM V -Classifying and Assessing Abnormal Behavior and Mental Disorders
Week 4
Please read chapter 5 and 6 on anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and PTSD, trauma-related disorders and somatic and dissociative disorders.

Discussion Forum
Assignment

Week 4 Quiz on PTSD
Define and explain anxiety disorders and its symptoms and treatments
Explain what somatic and dissociative disorders are and its symptoms and treatments.
Week 5
Read Chapter 7-Mood Disorders Depressive and Bipolar Disorders and Suicide
Watch video on depression (Out of the Shadow).

Discussion Forum
Week 5 Quiz

Depressive and Bipolar Disorders; Causes and Prevention and Assessment and Treatment
Week 6
We will cover chapter 8 (Eating Disorders) and chapter 9 (Substance Abuse).
Discussion Forum
Week 6 Brain Quiz

Explain and define eating disorders and substance abuse and addiction

Understand the Causes and symptoms and treatment options
Week 7
Read Chapter 10- Personality disorders
Cover Borderline Personality Disorder

Review midterm exam – See study guide
Discussion Forum
Assignment

Study for miderm exam ( Covers chapters 1- 7).
Understand personality disorders and Causes and symptoms and treatment options

Week 8
Take your midterm exam

Midterm exam
Discussion Forum
Please submit your midterm exam this week.

Week 9
Read Chapter 12 – Schizophrenia and Psychotic disorders

Discussion Forum
Assignment

Explain and define schizophrenia and psychotic disorders
Week 10
Read textbook Chapter 13 entitled; “Developmental and Disruptive Behavior Disorders”
Discussion Forum
Assignment
Explain and define various developmental and disruptive behaviors and disorders
Week 11
Read textbook Chapter 11 entitled; “Sexual Dysfunction and Gender Identity Disorders”

Discussion Forum
Assignment
Discuss gender dysphoria as a mental health disorder.

Evaluate the biological and psychological risk factors which may influence sexual dysfunction.
Week 12
Read chapter 14 on neurocognitive disorders.
Discussion Forum
Assignment
Review for final exam
(Chapters 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 15).
Neurocognitive Disorder: Understand and explain:
1.  Normal changes during aging
2.  Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease
3.  Causes and treatment of neurocognitive disorders
Week 13
Read textbook Chapter 15 entitled; ”
Consumer Guide to Abnormal Psychology”

Discussion Forum
Study for the final exam

Review study guide for the final exam.
Learning Objectives:
By end of this week, students will be able to :
1. Define and discuss contemporary legal and ethical issues in abnormal psychology including prevention and hospital interventions.
2. Examine residential treatment programs and deinstitutionalization.

Weeks 14/15
Take your final exam
Discussion Forum- Post your farewells Final Exam
Post your farewells to your classmates.
Submit your final exam.

  • The Biological Model
  • The Psychodynamic Model
  • The Humanistic Model
  • The Cognitive-Behavioral Model
  • The Sociocultural Model
  • Introduction
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Emil
    Kraepelin

    The Biological Model

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

  • Genetics
  • • Genotype
    – Produce characteristics such as eye color that

    do not

    change over time

    • Phenotype
    – Observable characteristic of a person that can

    change over time

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

  • Heritability of Major Mental Disorders
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Terminal button

    Nucleus

    Axon

    Cell body

    Dendrite

    Synapses

  • Nervous Systems and Neurons
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Neurotransmitter System Functions

  • Neurotransmitters
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

  • The Brain
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Cingulate gyrus

    Thalamus

    Mamillary body

    Hippocampus

    Amygdala

    Olfactory bulb

    Hypothalamus

    Limbic system

  • The Brain (cont’d.)
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    A 16-Year-Old Boy with
    Autism

    A 16-Year-Old Boy without Autism

  • Biological Assessment and Treatment
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

  • Evaluating the Biological Model
  • • The biological model assumes that mental
    states, emotions, and behaviors arise
    largely from physical processes

    • The biological model is important for
    understanding many components of major

    mental disorder

    s, but it cannot explain all
    aspects of the disorders

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Sigmund
    Freud

    The Psychodynamic Model

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Superego Ego

    Id Id
    Guiding principle: Pleasure
    Tasks: Attain gratification of wants,
    needs, and impulses

    Ego
    Guiding principle: Reality
    Tasks: Mediate demands of id and
    superego; cope with real world

    Superego
    Guiding principle: Morality
    Tasks: Develop conscience;
    block id impulses

    from Rathus, Psychology: Concepts and Connections, 9th ed., Fig. 11.1, p. 402. Copyright © 2005 Wadsworth, a part
    of Cengage Learning. Reproduced by permission. www.cengage.com/permissions.

    Brief Overview of the Psychodynamic
    Model

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Erotic
    Focus

    Stage

    Freud’s Psychosexual Stages of
    Development

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Intrapsychic
    Conflict

    (Between
    Id, Ego, and
    Superego)

    Anxiety
    Reliance on

    Defense
    Mechanisms

  • Defense Mechanisms
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Psychodynamic Assessment and
    Treatment

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Evaluating the Psychodynamic
    Approach

    • Strengths
    – Helps us focus on providing better

    environments for our children
    – Theory of defense mechanisms intuitive

    • Limitations
    – Relative lack of research support for its major

    assumptions

    – Abstract and difficult to measure

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    The Humanistic Model

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Qualitative assessment

    Nondirective therapy

    Humanistic Assessment and
    Treatment

  • Evaluating the Humanistic Model
  • • Strengths
    – Focuses on human choice and growth
    – Emphasizes client responsibility in recovery

    • Limitations
    – Unscientific, largely lacking empirical support
    – Less applicability to people with a severe

    mental disorder

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    *After the CS and UCS are paired the CS produces the conditioned response (CR), or avoidance.

    The Cognitive-Behavioral Model

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Behavior Repetition of behavior
    is more likely

    Positive reinforcement:
    pleasant event or reward

    Positive Reinforcement

    Copyright ©2015 Cengage Learning®

  • Behavioral Perspective
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Shawn flies
    on airplane

    Shawn has
    stomach virus

    Fear that he
    will get sick

    or feel ill
    if he flies

    Avoid flying:
    Takes the

    bus instead?

    Classical conditioning –
    Develop a fear of flying

    Fear “drives” the
    avoidance behavior

    Operant conditioning –
    Avoidance of flying reduces fear

    (Negative reinforcement)

    Copyright ©2015 Cengage Learning®

  • Learning Principles
  • The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Cognitive-Behavioral Assessment and
    Treatment

    • Treatments
    – Cognitive-behavioral therapy
    – Rational restructuring
    – Systematic sensitization
    – Exposure
    – Token economy

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    Evaluating the Cognitive-Behavioral
    Model

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

    The Sociocultural Model

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

  • Sociocultural Factors
  • • Culture
    • Gender
    • Neighborhoods and communities
    • Family

    The Biological
    Model

    The
    Psychodynamic
    Model

    The
    Humanistic
    Model

    The Cognitive-
    Behavioral
    Model

    The
    Sociocultural
    Model

  • Evaluating the Sociocultural Model
  • Chapter Reflections
  • • How do culture influence the development
    of mental health issues?

    • What aspects of neighborhoods,
    communities, and families are associated
    with stress and mental health?

    • What are strengths and limitations of the
    sociocultural perspective?

    • Slide 1
    • Introduction

      The Biological Model

      Genetics

      Heritability of Major Mental Disorders

      Nervous Systems and Neurons

      Neurotransmitters

      The Brain

      The Brain (cont’d.)

      Biological Assessment and Treatment

      Evaluating the Biological Model

      The Psychodynamic Model

    • Brief Overview of the Psychodynamic Model
    • Freud’s Psychosexual Stages of Development
    • Defense Mechanisms

    • Psychodynamic Assessment and Treatment
    • Evaluating the Psychodynamic Approach
    • The Humanistic Model

    • Humanistic Assessment and Treatment
    • Evaluating the Humanistic Model

      The Cognitive-Behavioral Model

      Behavioral Perspective

      Learning Principles

    • Cognitive-Behavioral Assessment and Treatment
    • Evaluating the Cognitive-Behavioral Model
    • The Sociocultural Model

      Sociocultural Factors

      Evaluating the Sociocultural Model

      Chapter Reflections

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