Posted: September 18th, 2022

Only do parts 4,5 and 6 https://www.gadoe.org/Pages/Home.aspx 5th Grade!!!

PlanningChart xCurriculumProjectMappingChartsEvidencesandResourcesAssignmentInstructionsnew xCurriculumProjectMappingChartsEvidencesandResourcesElementaryorSPEDTemplatenew x
 

Only do parts 4,5 and 6

https://www.gadoe.org/Pages/Home.aspx

5th Grade!!!

PLANNING CHART

3

PLANNING CHART 6

Planning Chart

Liberty University

EDUC 571

April 11,

2

022

Legend

A: Art

CC: Collaboration with colleagues

CE: Character education

CM: Communication

CT: Critical thinking

DA: Diversity/accommodation

E: English

EC: Economics

ELA: English Language Arts

EVAL: Evaluation (assessment)

GA: Group activity

L: Literacy

LI: Listening

LS: Life skills

HI: History

HS: Home/school connection (collaboration)

HW: Homework

M: Math

MA: Manipulative activity

OA: Opening Activity

OL: Oral language/presentations (public speaking)

PE: Physical education/movement

PS: Problem-solving

PW: Partner With

R: Reading

S: Science

T: Technology

W: Writing

Week 1, Day 1

Character Trait: Commitment

GA ENGLISH ELAGSE5

Reading Literary

GA MATH MSGSE5

Operation and Algebric Thinking

GA SCIENCE S5E

Physical Science

[OA, ELA, PW]: Students will be invited to create groups of three and discuss what they believe are the greatest active listening practices. One of the students will deliver the results to the rest of the class.

D: Students will share the facts they’ve discussed in groups, and the instructor will offer further information on the best active listening practices and the value of active listening.

[MU, IA, GA, T]: Using a laptop or cell phone, the instructor will play a song (chorus) loud enough to be heard by the whole class. It is expected that each student will take notes on what they hear. Afterwards, the students will be put into groups and instructed to write down what they hear. When the song’s words are presented, pupils will be able to see whether they were on track. He or she will walk around each group and see what each kid has come up with on their own and as a team.

EVAL: Active listening tactics will be the focus of each student’s paragraph, and he or she will have to explain why.

DA: Students on IEP and talented students will be partnered together so that the gifted students may help as needed in groups.

[M, CT, OA]: Students will be quizzed by the instructor on their present knowledge of numbers. Some simple questions will be used to do this. Based on the responses, it seems that students are familiar with the fundamentals of number sense, such as the location of ones and tens, but they may be unable to extend their knowledge beyond that.

[D, GA]: The primary goal of the teacher’s introduction of base ten ideas is to aid students in visualizing the numbers. Students should be able to speak numbers in their standard form, which is known as base ten ideas, by the conclusion of the courses. Groups of six-digit whole numbers will be given to students later in the course. As they learn to read and write, they’ll also have to figure out where each numeral goes and what it means. All group members will be required to provide a brief presentation of the work they’ve done during the discussion session.

EVAL: The instructor will pay close attention to the areas in which the pupils excel and those in which they struggle.

DA: If IEP learners fall behind, they will be paired with talented students who can help them catch up.

[OA, CT, BS, PW]: To begin, the instructor will define the word “machine” before introducing the concept. Students will be urged to discuss with their near neighbors about machinery they’ve seen at school or at home. This is how the instructor will travel around the classroom and see what the pupils have to say.

[D, CT, IA]: First, from the brainstorming, the instructor will begin to categorize some basic and sophisticated devices that were identified by various groups. Next, pupils will be required to divide their list of devices into basic and sophisticated machinery.

[HW, HS]: Student’s parents or guardians will be requested to assist them compile a list of household appliances.

DA: IEP students will be partnered with talented students to form small groups in which the gifted students may provide support as needed.

Week 1, day 2

Character Trait: Honesty

RF.1.1.a
ENGLISH 3.2

Communication and Multimodal Literacies

1.OA.1 & 1.OA.2 MATH 3.1 b, c

Number and Operations in Base Ten

GA SCIENCE 3.3

Physical Science

[OA, ELA]: Writing a paragraph on the jobs they want to pursue in the future will be required of students in this course. After that, they’ll get a few minutes to deliver a short oral presentation of what they’ve written.

[D, T, VC]: Afterwards, the instructor will show a short video on how to deliver oral presentations in the best possible manner. After seeing a film, the instructor will expand on the concepts offered and provide additional information about oral presentations.. The video can be retrieved from:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swIWHuIpubI.

[HW, HS]: Students will be required to compose a brief paragraph on the job of their parents or guardians with the assistance of their parents or guardians.

DA: Students who are visually impaired will be asked to concentrate on the audio portion of the video clip.

DA: In order to help pupils with special needs, talented students will be partnered with IEP students..

[OA, GW]: The notion of rounding off whole numbers will be introduced by the instructor. Students will be asked to form groups of three or four for a group exercise after a comprehensive introduction to the idea. They are going to practice rounding integers less than 9999 to the closest ten and hundred. In order to make sure that all pupils are on the same page, the instructor will conduct a group discussion. The instructor will ask the pupils to round off the initial numbers to the closest thousand if they round off numbers swiftly to the next tens and hundreds.

[HW, IA]: An assignment for students will be rounded to the closest tens, hundreds, and thousands of a particular number. The findings will allow the instructor to gauge the students’ level of comprehension.

DA: Students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) will be monitored by the instructor to see whether ideas taught need to be reviewed.

[OA, VC, T]: Afterward, the instructor will explain the various states of matter: solid, liquid and gaseous matter. This is followed by a brief video presentation by the instructor. Matter will be the focus of this video, which will build on and accentuate it.

[D, BS, CT]: When the instructor asks pupils to think, they’ll come up with familiar household liquids and solids like sugar and salt as examples. They’ll be required to explain what occurs when a solid like salt is combined with water.

D: When the instructor arrives, there will be some simple liquids and solids for the students to investigate the interactions between. Mixing solids and liquids at various temperatures might help pupils better understand how they vary.

HW: Mixing salt and water using both hot and cold water, students will be asked to write down what they see at home.

DA: When mixing liquids and solids in class, gifted students will be required to assist visually impaired pupils in determining what is occurring.

2

4

Week 1, day 3

Character Trait: Commitment

GA 1.RI.5 – READING 3.3

Communication and Multimodal Literacies

GA MATH 3.2

Number and Number Sense

GA SCIENCE 3.4

Life Science

OA: The notion of regular and irregular vowels will be introduced by the instructor, as well as the application of this information
.

[VC, IA]: In order to help students improve their pronunciation, the instructor will demonstrate it via a video clip. Once they’ve seen the video, students will be asked to write down the distinct vowel sounds they were able to distinguish. While walking around the classroom, the instructor will be checking on how each student is progressing.

[D, GW]: Groups of three or four students will be given a sheet of paper containing multisyllabic words and given a task to complete. They’ll have to work together to decipher words with many syllables that aren’t coded this way.

[HW, EVAL]: Vowel length will be emphasized in the classroom as students work to distinguish long and short vowels in phrases.

DA: In order to better support IEP children, they will be placed with talented pupils.

DA: There will be an emphasis on audio in the video for pupils who are visually challenged.

OA: It is possible that the instructor may introduce incorrect functionalities. As the students look at the fractions on the board, the instructor will quiz them on what makes each one special. Answers like: the numerator is larger, the denominator is smaller, and the numbers are the same on top and bottom are all predicted. The smartboard will be used by the instructor to illustrate how to convert improper fractions to mixed numbers using models after all students have a clear understanding of the difference between proper and improper fractions.

GA: Students will be split into two-person groups for the purpose of group work. Before converting to mixed numbers, they will physically create erroneous fractions using fraction manipulatives and then convert them. They’ll report their results to the class after they’ve completed their work
.

EVAL: Students’ work is evaluated by the instructor, who keeps track of how well they’re doing and determines whether or not they need further help.

DA: Gifted kids will be assigned to help children on IEPs as needed
.

OA: Students will learn about how animals adapt to their changing environments via an exploration of the notion of adaptation.

[GP, E]: For this activity, students will be divided into threes and asked to come up with some instances of animal adaptations that they’ve seen in the wild. At least three animal adaptations will be required from the students once they’ve completed their research.

DA: Adaptations will be discussed and classified as either physical or behavioral by the instructor. A short clip on animal adaptation will be shown to children to aid in their understanding of how various creatures have evolved.
The video can be retrieved from:

IA: At the conclusion of the class, students will be tested on their comprehension of fundamental adaptation concepts with a short quiz.

 
DA: IEP students will be requested for guidance from gifted pupils in areas where they may struggle. IEP kids will have the opportunity to speak with their instructor about any issues they are having.

References

American English. (2016).
Long and Short Vowels. Www.youtube.com. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySnnuIiiHII

Georgia Department of Education. (2021a).
GDOE: English Language Arts Georgia Standards of Excellence.

https://www.gadoe.org/Curriculum-Instruction-and-Assessment/Curriculum-and-Instruction/Documents/ELA/ELA-Standards-K-12-Summary-of-Changes-Revised-for-2015-2016

Georgia Department of Education. (2021b).
GDOE: Mathematics Georgia Standards of Excellence.

https://www.georgiastandards.org/Georgia-Standards/Pages/Math-K-5.aspx

Georgia Department of Education. (2021c).
GDOE: Science Georgoa Standards of Excellence.
https://www.georgiastandards.org/Georgia-Standards/Pages/Math-K-5.aspx

Learn Bright. (2020).
Animal Adaptations for Kids, Learn about the physical, life cycle, and behavioural adaptations of animals. Www.youtube.com. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2MibjJgyjs

Microbiology Society. (2016, February 22).
How to give an excellent oral presentation. Www.youtube.com. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swIWHuIpubI

Sanazaro, C. (2016.)
What’s in a name? [Lesson plan]. Retrieved from https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plans/teaching-content/whats-name-0/.

EDUC 571

Curriculum Project: Mapping, Charts, Evidences, and Resources Assignment Instructions

Instructions: Teacher candidates must be proficient in designing and implementing a curriculum based on state, national, and professional standards. Through this project, candidates will learn the importance of pacing the curriculum to teach essential grade level content. Candidates will experience how to write block plans for the curriculum. These plans include character education, appropriate learning activities, differentiated instruction, critical thinking skills, technology integration, and assessment. The plans provide opportunities for collaboration and integration across the curriculum.

Part 4: Curriculum Planning Charts

The candidate individually writes block curriculum plans (see sample templates and examples). The plans explain in detail what the teacher and students will do in each lesson. The plans demonstrate effective use of allotted time. The planned activities are creative, engaging, hands-on, and age-appropriate. The plans use the legend symbols to document integration.

Elementary/SPED candidates develop plans for a minimum of 20 days in the following subject areas: Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, as well as Fine Arts, Health, PE, and Movement. Secondary candidates develop plans for a minimum of 18 weeks in their specific content area and include integration across the curriculum. The plans show evidence of the following:

· Character Education

· Resources

· Developmental Learning

· Diversity & Accommodations

· Critical Thinking

· Active Learning Experiences

· Technology Experiences

· Assessment

· Collaboration

· Integration & Connections Across the Curriculum

Part 5: Evidence of Curriculum Requirements

The candidate identifies specific evidence to demonstrate how the following elements are incorporated into the Curriculum Project: the mission, character education, diversity and accommodations, critical thinking and problem-solving activities, active learning experiences, technology integration, assessment, collaboration, fine arts/health/PE, and integration between content areas. The candidate uses the completed (elementary/SPED [20 days total] curriculum charts to provide five best examples/evidences for each of the 12 Evidence of Curriculum Requirements charts. The candidate selects the best examples/evidences by comparing all the completed planning charts with the advanced indicators on the Curriculum Project grading rubric. The candidate provides the day of the planning and a detailed description. If the candidate cannot give five best examples for each evidences chart, revision of the Curriculum Project planning charts is needed (see sample templates and examples).

Part 6: Resources

The candidate must demonstrate differentiated student learning with many learning tools and manipulatives (eg. Base 10 Blocks, science lab equipment), and use of diverse professional resources (eg. books, journals, apps, websites, etc.) to plan instruction and learning experiences. The candidate includes 25 or more diverse professional resources (including research-based journal articles) to plan (elementary/SPED [20 days total] differentiated instruction and learning experiences. The candidate includes these resources in current APA format in the reference section at the end of the Curriculum Project (see sample templates and examples).

Title (Ex. Virginia Standards Curriculum Project: Fifth Grade)

Student Name

School of Education, Liberty University

Author Note

I have no known conflict of interest to disclose.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to

Email:

A: Art

CC: Collaboration with colleagues

CE: Character education

CM: Communication

CT: Critical thinking

DA: Diversity/accommodation

E: English

EC: Economics

ELA: English Language Arts

EVAL: Evaluation (assessment)

GA: Group activity

L: Literacy

LI: Listening

LS: Life skills

HI: History

HS: Home/school connection (collaboration)

HW: Homework

M: Math

MA: Manipulative activity

OA: Opening Activity

OL: Oral language/presentations (public speaking)

PE: Physical education/movement

PS: Problem-solving

PW: Partner With

R: Reading

S: Science

T: Technology

W: Writing

Running head: CURRICULUM PROJECT ELEM/SPED

1

CURRICULUM PROJECT
11

Curriculum Planning Charts

Sample:

Week 5 – Day #1

Character Education: Kindness

English/Language Arts

ELAGSE2RL7 – Use illustrations to demonstrate understanding of text.

Math

MGSE2.MD.8 – Word Problems with Money

Science

S2E2c – Use tables/graphs of length of the day/night to recognize change in seasons.

Social Studies/History

SS2H2a – Describe Georgia Creek Indians. Compare/contrast to today.

Fine Arts, Health, and PE/Movement

Day 1: LA/LI/R/L: Teacher reads My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss.

LA/OL/PS/CE/CM/LS: As a class, discuss colors and pictures and what they represent. Discuss emotions that match colors and how students can deal with their emotions in a healthy way.

LA/A/MA/T: As a class, look at color meaning chart of Native Americans on classroom iPads. (https://www.warpaths2peacepipes.com/native-american-symbols/color-meanings-symbolism.htm). Students create a mask using colors that represent themselves. Volunteers stand up and share.

LA/W/PS: Students write a journal entry on colors they used and why those colors represent them.

LA/R: Students who finish can read a trade book on day/night, seasons, or Native Americans.

Day 4: M/LI/R/L/CM: Teacher reads Follow The Money by Leedy and discusses uses for money.

M/CP/PS/MA/OL/CM/LS: Partners will be given a 4×4 grid of real-world word problems. They choose a row to complete. Students use play money manipulatives to answer questions. First work independently, then collaborate to compare answers and discuss. (http://www.k-5math

teachingresources.com/support-files/money-board )

M/DA: Teams who finish early can pick another row from the grid.

M/OL/E/CM: Partners explain each problem to the class. As an informal assessment, any problems that students could not understand should be addressed first.

Day 1: S/LI/R/L: Teacher reads What Makes Day and Night? by Branley.

S/MA/OL/CM: As a class, discuss how the Earth moves around the Sun, creating day and night. Students complete the activity in the book. One student is the earth with a lamp as the sun. Demonstrate as the earth turns, different sides have day and night.

S/GA/MA/MO: Class splits into two groups. One group is A and the other group is B. As the student (Earth) turns, each side is awake, standing up with their hands in the air, or asleep, touching the floor. Students stand up or squat down the faster the Earth moves.

S/LI: Teacher reads the Creek Indian legend on How Day and Night were Divided: http://www.indigenouspeople.net/howday.htm

Day 1: SS/LI/OL/R/L/CM: Teacher reads the Creek Indians by Scordato. Discuss and answer any questions.

SS/T: Teacher uses smart board to show where the Creek Indians were located.

SS/H/W/OL/CM: Students begin a flipbook and add information during the unit. First, students locate and color the area where the Creek Indians were located. The teacher emphasizes that locations were always near rivers and creeks. As a class, discuss health reasons to live near water. Teacher discusses where Creek Indians live today. Students add to flipbook page about Indians in modern times.

SS/CI/CC/CL/MO/T: Students take a field trip to the Etowah Indian Mounds Historic Site in Georgia. Students take pictures to post on class website.

Fine Arts

– Create a mask

Health

– Discuss why its healthy to live near water.

PE

– Jumping up and down for day and night.

– Brain break: GoNoodle.

Movement:

– Students explore Etowah Indian Mounds in North Georgia.

Template:

Use Legend

Use Legend

Use Legend

Use Legend

Week # – Day #

Character Education:

English/Language Arts

Standard:

Math

Standard:

Science

Standard:

Social Studies/History

Standard:

Fine Arts, Health, and PE/ Movement

Use Legend

Evidence of Curriculum Requirements

Sample:

Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving Activities

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

41

Students complete a Mathematics activity where they choose from a 4×4 grid of word problems to complete. The word problems concerning money require students to think critically and solve the problem.

43

In a Language Arts assessment, students complete short answer questions about a passage concerning the Creek Indians. The short answer questions require them to think critically.

50

In Social Studies, students complete a cut and paste activity to identify things that belong with Native Americans historically and things that belong with Native Americans today. Students are required to think critically to complete the activity.

Template:

Mission Statement
Integration

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Character Education
Integration

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Diversity & Accommodations

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving Activities

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Active Learning Experiences

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Technology Integration

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Assessment

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Collaboration

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Fine Arts Integration

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Health Integration

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

PE and Movement Integration

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Integration Between Content Areas

Day

Best Examples from Curriculum Charts

Resources


Learning Tools

Sample:

· Class set of I-pads

· Mini whiteboards


Manipulatives

Sample:

· Base ten blocks

· Magnifying glasses


Professional Sources

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