Posted: September 19th, 2022

Reflect upon your own personal views regarding ethics.

reflecting upon your own personal views regarding ethics in healthcare

Unit VI JOURNAL

Reflect upon your own personal views regarding ethics. Do you believe one can have different ethical standards in his or her personal life and work life in the healthcare field? Share an example you have experienced, witnessed, or heard of where there were two standards. Explain your perspective on the example.

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words. No references or citations are necessary.

UNIT VII JOURNAL

Click the link below to take a personality test to learn what personality type you are, and reflect on how it might affect your career advancement and growth in the healthcare field.

NERIS Analytics Limited. (n.d.). 
Free personality test. 16 Personalities. 


https://www.16personalities.com/free-personality-test

Describe your personality type, and describe how you feel you can use that knowledge to work more smoothly with others who may not share your personality traits or type. How do you think you can use this knowledge in your career advancement goals?

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words. No references or citations are necessary.

Unit VIII JOURNAL

During this course, we have covered many topics that play a part in being a healthcare professional. They have ranged from learning how to listen to what patients and colleagues are really saying to how to deal with anger and communicate efficiently. Reflect on which of these have most resonated with you and why. How have they given you new insight to your future or present role as a healthcare professional?

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words. No references or citations are necessary.

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 1

Course Learning Outcomes for Unit VI

Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:

2. Evaluate how ethical behavior affects the workplace.
2.1 Examine the connections between communication, personality, and ethics in a healthcare

setting.

Course/Unit
Learning Outcomes

Learning Activity

2.1

Unit Lesson
Chapters 9, 11
Article “The ant and the grasshopper: Work ethic by personality type.”
Unit VI PowerPoint Presentation

Reading Assignment

Chapter 9: Patient Interaction and Communication

Chapter 11: Professionalism in Action

Additional Reading Assignment:

In order to access the following resource, click the link below.

NERIS Analytics Limited. (2016). The ant and the grasshopper: Work ethic by personality type. 16

Personalities. https://www.16personalities.com/articles/the-ant-and-the-grasshopper-work-ethic-by-
personality-type

Unit Lesson

José is still thinking about communication and how it can change the whole tone and environment of the
healthcare organization and those who work within the organization. He realizes that communication has a
major impact on patient care—from ethical standards to quality of patient care. He also sees that ethics plays
a role in how we communicate. He goes to Jane to discuss this because he is finding it all tied together, and
he wants to talk about how he can improve the patient care he provides now and how to lead others to do
the same.

Jane listens to what José has to share and settles back to discuss the topics with him. She suggests that they
consider ethics first since many healthcare employees seem to struggle with this. Jane reminds José of the
incident last year where Yvonne became involved with a patient in their healthcare clinic. Yvonne felt sorry for
the patient who had lost his job, and she began to offer him rides to his appointments and then to go
shopping. Before long, Yvonne was seen dating him, and the healthcare clinic had to step in because this
was unethical behavior.

José remembered the incident because everyone was talking about it, and it was something that he was
uncomfortable with but did not know how to stop. The human resources (HR) department manager called
everyone together to discuss ethical communication and behaviors between employees and between
employees and patients. They had to do training about Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
(HIPAA) laws and where professional behavior ended and inappropriate personal behavior began. All this

UNIT VI STUDY GUIDE
Ethics, Patients, and You

https://www.16personalities.com/articles/the-ant-and-the-grasshopper-work-ethic-by-personality-type

https://www.16personalities.com/articles/the-ant-and-the-grasshopper-work-ethic-by-personality-type

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 2

occurred because Yvonne did not understand that compassion for a patient’s needs can conflict and clash
with compassion for a patient on a personal level.

José discovers from Jane that ethical behaviors also include cybersecurity. He had heard a lot about this in
the news with all of the healthcare organizations that had fallen victim to having their computer systems
compromised lately. He did not realize, however, that there was so much to the concepts or that they applied
to him even when in his office. He was surprised to learn from Jane that even taking home patient files on his
company-issued laptop could lead to cybersecurity issues that did not seem to relate to him when he was in
his HR security training courses each year.

José asks Jane about how he should approach his employees if he becomes a healthcare administrator since
there are so many different personalities in the office and in the patients they care for. Jane reminds José
about their talk last week where they looked at the different types of groups one encounters in an office. José
had actually identified with her what groups their healthcare organization and department had, and he placed
his colleagues within the different groups. José also has been studying about culturally appropriate patient
care at the following website, and he sees how all of this is tying together:
https://www.thinkculturalhealth.hhs.gov.

Jane now encourages José to consider how personalities play a role in providing patient care and in a
person’s work ethic. She shares that she comes from a culture where one’s personal space is very small, and
everyone in the community would step right up to others and start talking to them in their face as a colleague
once told her she does. She tells José that it took her a long time to understand that people have different
types and degrees of personal space and that violating that space can offend another person and can shut
down communication. She lists the types of personal space that exist, which are provided below.

• Social space: This space is set by the degree of familiarity one has with another person. When first
meeting someone, whether the person is a colleague, patient, or acquaintance, social space varies
from 4 to 12 feet depending on the physical environment.

Consider This!

José is aware of the HIPAA laws, but he realizes that he does not know much more than that he has
to respect patients’ rights; make sure that patients know all they need to know to make informed
healthcare decisions; and that information about a patient’s health can only be disclosed to the
patient, a legally designated person, or parent.

José decides he will go to the following website, which contains training materials for HIPAA
compliance. (You can access the website by clicking the link below.)

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. (n.d.). Training materials: Helping entities implement

privacy and security protections. http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-
professionals/training/index.html

On the aforementioned website, Jose finds a link that offers training on HIPAA and HIPAA violations,
which can be accessed by clicking the link below.

Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. (n.d.). Health IT privacy and

security resources for providers. https://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/guide-
privacy-and-security-electronic-health-information

Take a few minutes to visit the two websites that José visited. There you will find guides to the full
HIPAA rules and information on patient rights, cybersecurity, and more.

• What information did you find that you did not know about before?
• What information can affect ethical behavior toward and for a patient?
• How will your practice be affected by a careful understanding of HIPAA rules now or in the

f t if t tl l d h lth d i i t t ?

https://www.thinkculturalhealth.hhs.gov/

http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/training/index.html

http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/training/index.html

https://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/guide-privacy-and-security-electronic-health-information

https://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/guide-privacy-and-security-electronic-health-information

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 3

• Personal space: Once you know the person, being past that first period where introductions take
place, social space shrinks to about 1.5 to 4 feet and then becomes personal space. This is the space
that others felt Jane was violating when she should have been in their social space.

• Intimate space: Intimate space is actually the space in which the healthcare professional must do his
or her patient assessment or treatment. It is from 0 to 1.5 feet and necessary to provide care for the
patient. It can also be the spaces within which colleagues work as when sharing a computer or
reading a chart together (Colbert & Katrancha, 2016).

José tells Jane that he has seen a great website that is all about work ethic. He feels that work ethic ties to
personal space, communication, and HIPAA because some people want to get their work done as fast as
they can so they can party, and some focus intensely on work and leave play for a time when they can be
carefree. Each approach can affect the quality of patient care given and the relationships formed between
healthcare professionals. Jane acknowledges that it is all tied together; one part affects the other and can
lead to either positive or negative results.

José has come away from his talk with Jane with a clearer picture of how all behavior displayed by a
healthcare administrator plays a role in the greater picture of the healthcare organization and the kind of
patient care it provides. José knows that ethical behavior follows set laws, rules, and regulations; however, it
also includes the smaller things and interactions that happen each day between patients and healthcare
professionals. He knows it could be as small as knocking on a patient door before entering to as major as
providing the proper feedback to another person so communications are clear and result in a desired outcome
(Colbert & Katrancha, 2016; Stone & Heen, 2014).

References

Colbert, B. J., & Katrancha, E. D. (2016). Career success in health care: Professionalism in action (3rd ed.).

Cengage Learning.

Consider This!

José is realizing that ethics have as much to do with personality types as they do with culture and
background. He is fascinated by the idea that some people do not consider ethics the same way as
others do, and he took Jane’s advice to read the article below, which speaks on ethics and personality
types. (You can access the resource by clicking the link below.)

NERIS Analytics Limited. (2016). The ant and the grasshopper: Work ethic by personality type. 16

Personalities. https://www.16personalities.com/articles/the-ant-and-the-grasshopper-work-
ethic-by-personality-type

In reading over the article, José is able to identify himself as a diplomat and analyst because he
knows he is analytical about all that he encounters in life. He tries to balance his work and personal
life by sometimes putting work first and by sometimes putting play first.

José starts to think about those he works with and how each fits within the personality types in the
article. He sees that Jane is more of a sentinel who works hard so she can plan for a future she
envisions for herself. He sees his coworker Roger as being more of an explorer who does not seem to
care much about his job; Roger just puts in his hours and always thinks about what he will do when he
is home.

Consider your personality type. Are you an ant or a grasshopper? Do you see yourself as an explorer,
diplomat/analyst, or a sentinel? How does your personality type play into your work ethic? How does it
affect the care you provide now or will provide as a healthcare administrator to your patients?

https://www.16personalities.com/articles/the-ant-and-the-grasshopper-work-ethic-by-personality-type

https://www.16personalities.com/articles/the-ant-and-the-grasshopper-work-ethic-by-personality-type

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 4

Stone, D., & Heen, S. (2014). Thanks for the feedback: The science and art of receiving feedback well.
Viking.

Suggested Reading

In order to access the following resources, click the links below.

These websites contain a vast supply of information and training for the healthcare administrator. You are
encouraged to take the time to explore them and bookmark them for future reference.

Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. (n.d.). Health IT privacy and security

resources for providers. https://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/guide-privacy-and-security-
electronic-health-information

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. (n.d.). Training materials: Helping entities implement privacy

and security protections. http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/training/index.html

Learning Activities (Nongraded)

Nongraded Learning Activities are provided to aid students in their course of study. You do not have to submit
them. If you have questions, contact your instructor for further guidance and information.

Research three websites that are patient-focused and explain patient rights in layman’s terms. Prepare a
pamphlet that explains patient rights and recommends one of the websites for patients to learn more about
their rights.

This exercise will not only allow you to further your knowledge in the area, but the pamphlet can be added to
the toolbox you are building and can be used as a training aid in the future.

https://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/guide-privacy-and-security-electronic-health-information

https://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/guide-privacy-and-security-electronic-health-information

http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/training/index.html

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 1

Course Learning Outcomes for Unit VII

Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:

7. Formulate a plan for advancing in a career.
7.1 Integrate a decision-making process to plan for your own career advancement.

Course/Unit

Learning Outcomes
Learning Activity

7
Unit Lesson
Chapter 10
Unit VII Scholarly Activity

7.1
Unit Lesson
Video: “Discover your Personality Type”
Unit VII Scholarly Activity

Reading Assignment

Chapter 10: Your First Position as a Health Care Professional

Additional Reading Assignment:

In order to access the following resource, click the link below.

Truity. (2011, June 17). Discover your personality type | Myers Briggs [Video]. YouTube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQoOqQiVzwQ

Unit Lesson

One thing that José has discovered on his journey to learn about the role of healthcare administrator and how
to advance his career in the field is that he has to learn to think differently and to approach reasoning from the
point of view of others if he wants to be successful. In looking at a YouTube video about personality types
called Discover Your Personality Type, he has learned that there are even ways to measure a person’s
personality. He also has learned that the person’s personality type leads to different ways of thinking.

José has learned that critical thinking is the key to good management. He asks Jane about her viewpoint on
critical thinking, and Jane shares the following points with José, saying that it is really more about leadership
than management (Porter-O’Grady & Malloch, 2015). Jane said that critical thinking involves the following
things:

• being able to analyze what another says and means,
• reaching some kind of determination about that meaning,
• looking at all options,
• making a conclusion about what needs to be done, and
• sharing the results with others in a clear manner.

José tells Jane that he makes decisions differently from her, and she acknowledges that this is true from what
she has observed. Jane tells José that he tends to think deductively because she sees him asking for facts
about a situation and assumes that the facts are true. She says that it reminds her of someone going from A
to B to C and so on to get to Z. José agrees that he does think that way, but he does not feel that Jane does.
Jane agrees with his assessment. Jane tells José that she uses inductive reasoning a lot, which she likens to

UNIT VII STUDY GUIDE
Plan to Get Ahead

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 2

going from A to D to Q to F and then to Z. She says that this is something that she does based on what she
feels and is less reliable at times than what José does, but both approaches are fine (Colbert & Katrancha,
2016).

She goes on to say that critical thinking is often based on deductive thinking, which is where one seeks out
knowledge and keeps a healthy questioning attitude. She says that it is important to think critically when
caring for patients in any healthcare organization and for leading those who provide that care to ensure
quality and open communication. Jane tells José that she has seen his growth in this area over his time at the
clinic and feels that it is time for him to advance in his career with the clinic. She feels that he is making solid
decisions in his research about the role of healthcare administrator and feels he should definitely apply for the
position she is vacating.

Based on what José has learned about personalities and thinking, Jane feels it is time for them to discuss the
decision-making process. José tells Jane that he has been thinking about this for some time as he considers
how to advance his career as a healthcare administrator and formulates a plan to prepare to apply for the
position she is vacating. He shares how he has discovered that there are actually well-defined steps in the
decision-making process, which are listed below (Colbert & Katrancha, 2016).

• Step 1: Define the opportunity with the mindset of the change being a positive experience. Ask the
questions below.
o How does this change affect the patients in our care?
o How does this change influence the work environment and processes?

• Step 2: Generate ideas with the mindset that there are often more ways than one to address a
change, and critical thinking about the change sets the tone. Ask the questions below.
o How many different ideas can we generate?
o Can we suspend the voice in our heads that says, “That is not how we do things here”?

• Step 3: Evaluate all possible ideas, and select the best by asking the questions below.
o What are the pros of the different ideas we have generated?
o What are the cons of the different ideas we have generated?
o Which idea has the best chance for success, and why?

• Step 4: Implement the best idea in the best way possible so positive change results. Ask the
questions below.
o How should we implement this idea?
o Who needs to know about the idea?
o Who are key stakeholders relevant to the idea?
o What strengths do we have that will help with implementing the idea?
o What skills do we have that will aid in implementing the idea?

• Step 5: Evaluate the outcomes of the change by asking the questions below.
o Were patients affected in a positive way?
o Were the quality of care standards met?
o Did the idea implemented have a positive outcome and make a positive change?
o Can we continue with the idea?

Jane is pleased with the steps of the decision-making process that José shared with her. She feels that he
has identified the key questions that ensure each step has a positive outcome. José has realized that he has
always used the five steps in the decision-making process at the clinic and that using them now, as he
decides what his next career goals and advancements should be, is key to the whole process. He clearly
sees how he will plan for the job interview he faces for the new position, basing it on a systematic decision-
making process.

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 3

José has decided that he is a critical thinker and that his personality type can be used as an advantage in the
role of healthcare administrator. He feels more prepared to make important decisions related to quality patient
health care and that he has an idea about how he can use all that he learned to develop his future
professional goals. José has discovered that a clear decision-making process helps in planning and
advancing in a career. He now knows that having a systematic approach will lead to not only a successful
career plan but will also make him more effective in fulfilling his role as a healthcare professional.

References

Colbert, B. J., & Katrancha, E. D. (2016). Career success in health care: Professionalism in action (3rd ed.).

Cengage Learning.

Porter-O’Grady, T., & Malloch, K. (2015). Quantum leadership: Building better partnerships for sustainable

health (4th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Truity. (2011, June 17). Discover your personality type | Myers Briggs [Video]. YouTube.

Consider This!

Jane tells José that Step 2 is often defined in terms of brainstorming where ideas flow freely and without
judgment calls being made. She asks José to take the following opportunity to brainstorm three possible
ideas to address a situation in which patient wait times have increased to 30 minutes on average.

Help José by identifying three ideas to use to address this opportunity. Some might be to accomplish the
following tasks:

• decrease the number of patients scheduled for each time slot,
• increase the time slotted for each appointment by 5 minutes, and
• hire a new nurse practitioner or physician.

José decides that he will go one step further and address Step 3 because Jane’s request has spurred him
to think about how he will evaluate the ideas he brainstormed. He then creates a possible short- and long-
term outcome for each of the ideas generated above.

• Short-term goal 1:
o Decrease patient waiting time by 5 minutes.

• Long-term goal 1:
o Decrease patient waiting time by 20 minutes.

• Short-term goal 2:
o Send out patient insurance forms a week before the appointment so patients do not have to fill

them out when they arrive.
• Long-term goal 2:

o Place the patient insurance forms on a patient portal, and have the patient fill them out or
review them two days before they arrive at the appointment.

• Short-term goal 3:
o Assign more staff to reception during high-patient volume hours.

• Long-term goal 3:
o Hire two new receptionists.

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 4

Suggested Reading

You read the following textbook chapter in Unit III. It is suggested to review this chapter for this unit as the
concepts are explored further.

Chapter 4: Thinking and Reasoning Skills

In order to access the following resource, click the link below.

José has discovered that personalities influence all we do and how we relate to culture. Much was learned
about culture by of exploring the website for the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services in Unit V. This
article expands that knowledge by linking culture and personality.

Gridley, M. C. (2014). Cross-cultural comparison of engineers’ thinking styles. Psychology Journal, 11(2), 55–

59.
https://libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direc
t=true&db=a9h&AN=98995352&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Learning Activities (Nongraded)

Nongraded Learning Activities are provided to aid students in their course of study. You do not have to submit
them. If you have questions, contact your instructor for further guidance and information.

José has found himself thinking about thinking, something that he never did before his conversation with
Jane. He locates an article that goes much further in-depth about the critical thinking process and its
application in health care. It asserts that critical thinking influences clinical decision-making.

You can read the article by clicking the link below.

Riddell, T. (2007). Critical assumptions: Thinking critically about critical thinking. Journal of Nursing

Education, 46(3), 121–126.
https://libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/login?auth=CAS&url=http://search.proquest.com.library
resources.columbiasouthern.edu/docview/203948831?accountid=33337

https://libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=98995352&site=ehost-live&scope=site

https://libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=98995352&site=ehost-live&scope=site

https://libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/login?auth=CAS&url=http://search.proquest.com.libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/docview/203948831?accountid=33337

https://libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/login?auth=CAS&url=http://search.proquest.com.libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/docview/203948831?accountid=33337

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 1

Course Learning Outcomes for Unit VIII

Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:

1. Summarize the essential qualities of a healthcare professional.

2. Evaluate how ethical behavior affects the workplace.

3. Recommend methods that foster teamwork among colleagues.

4. Discuss the impact personal skills have on the workplace.

5. Discuss the importance of healthcare organization values.

6. Develop a job search strategy.
6.1 Describe the personal steps needed to prepare for a job change.

7. Formulate a plan for advancing in a career.

Course/Unit

Learning Outcomes
Learning Activity

1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7 Final Exam

6.1
Unit Lesson
Article: Managing job transitions: Thirteen questions for a successful search
Final Exam

Reading Assignment

In order to access the following resource, click the link below.

The following article is located in the CSU Online Library and can be accessed at the link provided below. It
will provide you with insight on preparing for a job interview.

Broscio, M., & Scherer, J. (2003). Managing job transitions: Thirteen questions for a successful search.
Journal of Healthcare Management, 48(5), 287.
https://libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=tr
ue&db=a9h&AN=10893811&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Unit Lesson

It has been a long few weeks for José. He has learned a great deal about the healthcare administrator role he
has been considering applying for now that Jane is leaving the position. He made his decision to apply for the
position, and he was surprised when he went to thank Jane and she stopped him from leaving her office.

Jane tells José that he needs to be sure he is prepared to apply for her role. She asks him if he has read the
job description for the position, and he is surprised to realize that he has not actually done so. Jane tells him
that he might be surprised just what is involved in her role and needs to read the job description for it. She
also suggests that he go look on the Internet to see if he can find other such job descriptions. This will help
him to see what is standard for the role of healthcare administrator and what might be unique to the position
in his clinic.

UNIT VIII STUDY GUIDE
Go Get That Job

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 2

Jane urges José to carefully consider all parts of the job description. She suggests that he think about the
questions below.

• What new responsibilities would he have?
• Does he have the skills needed for the position?
• Are the minimum required skills enough to be successful in the role?
• What kinds of computer skills are necessary for the position?
• To whom would he be reporting?
• Who reports to him?
• Are there any benefit changes that he would have to consider?
• What is the salary range, and where does he think he fits?

José knew that he would have new responsibilities, but he did not realize that he would have to do budgeting
and staffing reports. While he knows how to use Excel, he did not know he would have to learn how to use
new business reporting software to help prepare graphics for presentations to the board of directors. He was
good at mastering new software, but he decided that he might want to start looking into other areas that he
had not considered until now.

José has also learned that before a hiring decision is made, he will likely have to interview with several people
in the healthcare organization. He read in a human resources (HR) article about 10 things to consider when
interviewing for a job (Colbert & Katrancha, 2016; Martin, n.d.; Stone & Heen, 2014):

1. Know the organization’s mission, philosophy, and services. José had learned that this was important
before now, but the reality of knowing this became much clearer when he thought about the job
interview.

2. Dress as a professional should. José thought this fit in the old adage to dress for success. Recall
previous discussions between Jane and José regarding professional image presentation. This
presentation applies to both colleagues and patients.

3. Have a portfolio of documents that you might need. Being prepared meant having a copy of a résumé
handy as well as college transcripts.

4. Of course, being on time for an interview is important. It was just the courteous thing to do in any
situation, but José knew very well how even some of the administrators of his healthcare organization
arrived late to meetings and how that made him feel.

5. Show an interest in the position. This seemed like a no-brainer, but it meant more than just looking
intently at the interviewer in José’s mind. Trying to reply with positive statements, even when asked
negative questions, and being specific and direct with his responses should show that he was
enthusiastic about the position.

Consider This!

José has done his homework; he has gone online and found three actual job descriptions for
a healthcare administrator. Much to his surprise, he discovers they are not all the same.
While he has a basic understanding of Jane’s job because they work together, he did not
realize the position could have such varying requirements and responsibilities.

Go to the Internet, and do a search for “healthcare administrator job descriptions.” Find three
job descriptions, and compare them.

Ask yourself the questions below.

• Do all healthcare administration positions perform the same job functions?
• What kinds of skills do the positions require?
• What benefits are being offered?
• How can I best leverage my skills and knowledge for each of these positions?
• What type of experience or training will I need for the positions?

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 3

6. Listening is an important part of the interview process. José and Jane had discussed this at length
before, and here he was seeing in the literature how listening can increase interview success.

7. Give straight answers, be direct, and show interest. This applies not only to the interview but also in
communication with José’s colleagues and, in the future, with his staff.

8. Be specific. This also went right along with showing interest and being direct for José.
9. Ask questions. This was another pointer that José read that made good sense. It would help him

show that he was interested, enthusiastic, and could ask questions in the future if he did not
understand something.

10. Follow up with the interviewer. This was a new concept to José, but he did see the need to thank the
person who interviewed him since this was just a part of being a polite professional.

José felt that he was ready for his interview until he found a list of 10 things not to do in an interview. Every
one of the things on that list really seemed to match an item on the list of things to consider that José had
read in the HR article. He did have trouble understanding how someone might go to a job interview and
interrupt or lie or just be rude, but he knew that these things did happen.

It has been a long road for José. He has learned that there are many levels to being a healthcare
professional. He feels that one of the key elements he has come away with is that respect for everyone, from
your patients to your colleagues and supervisors, is vital to maintaining an effective functioning team and
ultimately to providing quality patient care.

José feels that he has done his homework to prepare for the new position and will make a good leader and
healthcare administrator. He has taken a good look at himself, honestly assessing his skills, personality,
ethics, and cultural competency. He has assessed his organization and its structure, values, and
communications to give perspective to his anticipated responsibilities. He has sought input from others,
researched the job requirements, and begun to build a toolbox of resources that will assist him as he changes
roles. He has developed a résumé and prepared for interviews, and he feels that he is ready to take the next
step in his career.

José and his journey has been the model in this course to help us understand what is required of a healthcare
professional to develop skills that will facilitate advancement and success. José was wise to seek out Jane as
a mentor and to help him see things from a different perspective. As you prepare to or continue to progress in
your career goals, consider the many topics covered in this course as applied to your own situation. Continue

Consider This!

José has been reading about the 10 things not to do in an interview (Colbert & Katrancha,
2016). Help him identify how to turn these do nots into dos.

• “My former employer was a real micromanager who always made me feel
incompetent.”

• “I am waiting for a very important call, so I apologize, but I have to have my cell
phone on me and set to ring out loud.”

• “Yeah, I know exactly where you are going with that! You do not have to finish
that sentence!”

• “Say! Who do you think should be president? I mean, a person in your position
must have some insight here.”

• “Well, OMG! I am glad that y’all feel that way. Me too! How cool is that?”
• “I really need this job. I promise I will do a good job for you. I cannot pay my rent

next month if you do not hire me!”
• “Yes, I helped with that major earthmoving project you heard about in the papers.

I just did not want to be mentioned because I hate publicity.”
• “Ya’ think?! Of course, I can do that; anyone can!”
• “What? I am sorry. I totally missed what you were saying there.”
• “Well, ok then, thanks. I have to get going. Bye.”

BHA 3202, Standards for Health Care Staff 4

to build your toolbox with resources and links that you can utilize in your own plan, and use these resources
to mentor and help colleagues in the future.

References

Colbert, B. J., & Katrancha, E. D. (2016). Career success in health care: Professionalism in action (3rd ed.).

Cengage Learning.

Martin, C. (n.d.). 10 interviewing rules. Monster. https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/ten-

interviewing-rules

Stone, D., & Heen, S. (2014). Thanks for the feedback: The science and art of receiving feedback well.

Viking.

Suggested Reading

In order to access the following resources, click the links below.

The following articles in the CSU Online Library will help you learn more about how to prepare for a job
interview.

Captain Bob. (1997). Conquering the job interview. Fire Engineering, 150(8), 127.

https://libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direc
t=true&db=a9h&AN=9709240338&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Holveck, D. A. (1984). Your job interview: Make others see you as you see yourself. Nursing, 14(11), 32c–32j.
https://libraryresources.columbiasouthern.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direc
t=true&db=a9h&AN=4891786&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Learning Activities (Nongraded)

Nongraded Learning Activities are provided to aid students in their course of study. You do not have to submit
them. If you have questions, contact your instructor for further guidance and information.

Go to your choice of a search engine, and do a search for how to write a résumé. Choose one style of a
résumé you find, and create a new résumé for a new position that you are considering now or in the future.
You may use one of the three job descriptions you found in the Consider This! section of the Unit Lesson or
find another of your choosing.

Ensure you address your specific skills and knowledge in your résumé that are required for the position you
choose. You will find these in the Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) section(s) of most job descriptions.

Practicing to write résumés and having a template ready are vital tools to have in your toolbox. You will never
even get to the interview if your résumé does not stand out to the employer.

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