Posted: September 19th, 2022

SEE DIRECTIONS ATTACHED IN BOTTOM THE SEVEN STEPS ARE ON THE WORD DOC ATTACHED TOO YOU NEED TO ANSWER THIS IS 2 PAGES LONG

DIRECTIONS1 xSeven-StepGuide
 

SEE DIRECTIONS ATTACHED IN BOTTOM

THE SEVEN STEPS ARE ON THE WORD DOC ATTACHED TOO YOU NEED TO ANSWER

THIS IS 2 PAGES LONG

2

Seven Steps to Ethical-Decision Making DIRECTIONS:

You will be required to read a newspaper and/or magazine article dealing with ethical issues and analyze the issue following the Seven Step Guide to Ethical Decision Making  guide. The issue should be relevant to the topics presented in this course. Your assignment should be approximately 2 pages long to fully answer all 7 steps.

1. Please review 

detailed assignment instructions

Actions

 and the grading rubric associated with this assignment. See 

How do I view the rubric for this assignment?
 (Links to an external site.)

2. Format your paper so that you are answering each of the seven questions. You assignment can be numbered, there does not need to be an introduction or conclusion, just simply answer the questions. 

Please also review this video walkthough with instructions: 

Video Walk-Through
 (Links to an external site.)

image1

1 Adapted from Michael Davis, Ethics and the University (Routledge, London, 1999), pp.
166-67.

SEVEN-STEP GUIDE FOR ETHICAL DECISION MAKING¹

1. State problem. Something specific – some feeling or thought – has led you to think you have a
possible ethical problem. What is it? For example, “there’s something about this decision that
makes me uncomfortable” or “do I have a conflict of interest?”

2. Check facts. Many problems disappear upon closer examination of the situation, while others
change radically.

3. Identify relevant factors. For example, the persons involved, applicable laws, professional codes
or standards, other practical constraints (for example, the gift you have received would create a
clear conflict of interest if it were really large, but it is worth only $25).

4. Develop a list of options. What other actions or decisions are available to you besides the
original one that started you thinking? Be imaginative. Try to avoid “dilemmas.” Look for
something besides a simple “yes, do it” or “no, don’t do it.” Consider whom to go to and the
perspectives and/or help they can give, not just what to say or do.

5. Test the options. Use such tests as the following:

a. Harm test: Does this option do less harm than the alternatives?

b. Publicity test: Would I want my choice of this option published in the newspaper?
Would I want my Grandma to know?

c. Defensibility test: Could I defend this choice of option before a committee of peers, or a
Congressional committee, without appearing self-serving?

d. Reversibility test: Would I still think this choice of option was good if it were applied to
me instead of others, especially if some of the effects are adverse?

e. Colleague test: What might my profession’s governing board or ethics committee say
about this option?

f. Organization test: What does my organization’s ethics officer or legal counsel say about
this?

g. Virtue test: Would a virtuous person do this? What kind of person does this? What kind
of person would I become if I did this kind of thing all the time?

6. Make a choice based on steps 1-5.

7. Review steps 1-6. What could you do to make it less likely that you would have to make such a
decision again?

a. Are there any precautions you can take as an individual (for example, announce your
policy on the question, change jobs, etc.)?

b. Is there any way to have more support next time?

c. Is there any way to change your organization (for example, suggest policy changes at the
next department meeting)?

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